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Just got a Anne Gold Raspberry plant and looking for advice  RSS feed

 
Johnny Gisson
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I just got a nice cane of Anne Gold that has some new green growth on it all over the cane and a bunch of new plants popping up all around it!
Very excited to get this for only $5 at local nursery.

I bought one last year and it was suppose to be Anne Gold but the berries were red so looking forward to trying this variety again.


I would love to hear anyone's experience with this variety or what you might know from someone that does grow it.


 
mike mclellan
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Location: Helena, MT zone 4
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Scott,
Well this is try # 2. I grow Anne raspberries in west-central Montana in the dry Helena valley. The berries have survived -25F with mostly dry, cold winters with little snow cover. I usually cut the canes back in late winter so that I only get a fall crop. Last year I let the canes stand and they did resprout and flowered some but I got a very poor spring crop. I don't think it was worth the effort ( or lack of it as I didn't go to the trouble to cut them back.) I have mulched them to the depth of an inch or so with leaves and wood chips and they've done well except for my attempt at a spring crop. I don't plan to try that again any time soon. The berries themselves are delicious, sweeter than any I've ever had from any store. They, to my eye at least, are a pale salmon pink when ripe. They are only in the sweet spot for four days or so. The canes sucker freely so my original 25 plants are now in the hundreds. I've transplanted a lot of them and they take pretty easily. I do irrigate them probably once every ten days. I hope this answers at least some of your questions.
 
Johnny Gisson
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mike mclellan wrote:Scott,
Well this is try # 2. I grow Anne raspberries in west-central Montana in the dry Helena valley. The berries have survived -25F with mostly dry, cold winters with little snow cover. I usually cut the canes back in late winter so that I only get a fall crop. Last year I let the canes stand and they did resprout and flowered some but I got a very poor spring crop. I don't think it was worth the effort ( or lack of it as I didn't go to the trouble to cut them back.) I have mulched them to the depth of an inch or so with leaves and wood chips and they've done well except for my attempt at a spring crop. I don't plan to try that again any time soon. The berries themselves are delicious, sweeter than any I've ever had from any store. They, to my eye at least, are a pale salmon pink when ripe. They are only in the sweet spot for four days or so. The canes sucker freely so my original 25 plants are now in the hundreds. I've transplanted a lot of them and they take pretty easily. I do irrigate them probably once every ten days. I hope this answers at least some of your questions.



Sorry it took so long to respond Mike I been too busy spring planting with too many plants and not enough room I forgot all about my post.
Thank you for your response!
-25 below wow what a tough raspberry plant.
I am going to cut the canes too like you in the late winter for just a fall crop on all my raspberry varieties.
How careful do I have to be digging up a sucker and transplanting it? any tips?
I was wondering if when raspberries are planted on a hill, will they grow suckers going up or down the hill or expand and grow suckers both up and down the hill?
You sure sound like you know Anne.

I have read that this variety is sweet and that is a nice addition to my Heritage variety!
I am surprised Anne Gold variety grows in such a cold area.
Do you have any other varieties of raspberries growing in Montana?
 
steve bossie
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Location: Northern Maine (zone 3b-4a)
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only drawback to anne and heritage cultivars is they ripen in mid september, which is when we have our 1st frost in n. maine. i dug out my heritages for that reason. lost most of my crop because it was so late. if your in a zone 4b or higher it shouldn't be a problem. now i have joan j and polka which ripens in august so i get a full crop before frost.
 
Johnny Gisson
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steve bossie wrote:only drawback to anne and heritage cultivars is they ripen in mid september, which is when we have our 1st frost in n. maine. i dug out my heritages for that reason. lost most of my crop because it was so late. if your in a zone 4b or higher it shouldn't be a problem. now i have joan j and polka which ripens in august so i get a full crop before frost.


First frost in September wow that is too early glad you worked that out Steve. We are 6a 6b zone borderline so Heritage is OK.

Joan J looks good big berries and no thorns.

Just planted my Anne Gold an hour ago. Finally warm enough now and I figured out where I want to plant it.

I read it should be planted 2 inches deeper than it was in the pot. Is that true? I went and pushed it down a couple inches.

And also is it true I need to cut the oldest cane to 4-6 inches right after planting? Isn't it to late in the spring to do that or is it just something that should be done after planting any raspberry cane?

Is it true Heritage can be grown without trellising?

Can Anne Gold be grown without trellising?

The Penn State University site says this "Remove flower blossoms in the first year to encourage plant establishment."
I suppose that would be a good idea for my Anne Gold.

How does picking off the blossoms work out for you guys??
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mike mclellan
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Location: Helena, MT zone 4
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Scott,, My berries sucker in all directions, both uphill and downhill. My Annes stand very upright between a meter to meter and a half or so tall. They are strong enough canes they don't need trellising. Transplanting suckers is pretty easy. I cut whatever root I can get about four to five inches from the center of the crown. They almost always come up . Don't transplant too deeply. The "new shoots must be exposed to sunlight early after emerging from the crown of the plant. Yes, I grow two other varieties of red raspberry. One I have no idea the variety, just called Rocky Mountain raspberry by the person who gave it to me. The other is called Mammoth from Gurneys. They are delicious,upright,sucker aggressively, and have a harvest period of five weeks or so in midsummer. These only produce on second year wood. I hope this helps.
 
Johnny Gisson
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mike mclellan wrote:Scott,, My berries sucker in all directions, both uphill and downhill. My Annes stand very upright between a meter to meter and a half or so tall. They are strong enough canes they don't need trellising. Transplanting suckers is pretty easy. I cut whatever root I can get about four to five inches from the center of the crown. They almost always come up . Don't transplant too deeply. The "new shoots must be exposed to sunlight early after emerging from the crown of the plant. Yes, I grow two other varieties of red raspberry. One I have no idea the variety, just called Rocky Mountain raspberry by the person who gave it to me. The other is called Mammoth from Gurneys. They are delicious,upright,sucker aggressively, and have a harvest period of five weeks or so in midsummer. These only produce on second year wood. I hope this helps.


Hey that is very good news! Thank you Mike.

I had a very small loose sucker fall out when I transplanted. Unfortunately the green part with the growth snapped off the white root just from handling it.
I still planted the shoot and the root separately but I don't think that will amount to anything.

I wish I had the Mammoth, I am looking for the largest berries I can grow!

Should I cut the old cane 4-6 inches right after planting? If so I will do that tomorrow.

Is picking off blossoms something I should do? and should I do it every year until a certain month then stop?
i am only interested in the fall crops for Heritage and Anne.

Can I spread the plants faster by bending the tips of their canes to the ground so they root starting new plants, leapfrogging?
I know you can do this with blackberries.

Going to plant two Kiowa blackberry plants this week also.
 
steve bossie
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scott taras wrote:
mike mclellan wrote:Scott,, My berries sucker in all directions, both uphill and downhill. My Annes stand very upright between a meter to meter and a half or so tall. They are strong enough canes they don't need trellising. Transplanting suckers is pretty easy. I cut whatever root I can get about four to five inches from the center of the crown. They almost always come up . Don't transplant too deeply. The "new shoots must be exposed to sunlight early after emerging from the crown of the plant. Yes, I grow two other varieties of red raspberry. One I have no idea the variety, just called Rocky Mountain raspberry by the person who gave it to me. The other is called Mammoth from Gurneys. They are delicious,upright,sucker aggressively, and have a harvest period of five weeks or so in midsummer. These only produce on second year wood. I hope this helps.


Hey that is very good news! Thank you Mike.

I had a very small loose sucker fall out when I transplanted. Unfortunately the green part with the growth snapped off the white root just from handling it.
I still planted the shoot and the root separately but I don't think that will amount to anything.

I wish I had the Mammoth, I am looking for the largest berries I can grow!

Should I cut the old cane 4-6 inches right after planting? If so I will do that tomorrow.

Is picking off blossoms something I should do? and should I do it every year until a certain month then stop?
i am only interested in the fall crops for Heritage and Anne.

Can I spread the plants faster by bending the tips of their canes to the ground so they root starting new plants, leapfrogging?
I know you can do this with blackberries.

Going to plant two Kiowa blackberry plants this week also.
hi scott. it looks like your plant was cut back at the nursery already so i think you're good with that. as far as spreading them. by next year you will have dozens of shoots coming up around your plant! dig up the ones that are growing up out of your row and plant them where you want. my heritages got 8ft. tall 2 years ago and i didn't have them tresseled. i should have tipped them at 4 ft but most of them stayed upright. anne should be similar. yes pinch off all the blossoms the first year so the plant forms strong roots. i stated my raspberry patch with 1 heritage. by the second year i had 2 rows with 30 plants from that 1 plant! plant your raspberries with the roots hoizontal to the ground only a few inches under the soil so the roots can send up new shoots the next year. also cut off this years growth this winter . new ones will come up this spring. mulching with pine needles helps keep weeds down and adds some acidity, which raspberries like. good luck!
 
steve bossie
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i just planted 5 prime ark freedom blackberries. they are thornless and primocane fruiting like my raspberries so i don't have to worry about cane survival over the winter! I'm pretty excited as our winters are too cold for regular florocane varieties to survive! freedom supposed to have a big sweet berry. i can't wait!
 
Johnny Gisson
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Thank you Steve.
I just bought 3 more Anne Gold bare root canes on Ebay from a licensed Oregon nursery.
I will plant them in a row with the one I just planted.
How far would you say I should space out these plants?

My Heritage variety are growing like mad. If I pinch off the blossoms until September, would I get a decent fall crop this year or is it not worth sacrificing the root growth?
 
steve bossie
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i would put them 2feet apart to give them room to spread. i would pinch them till fall then cut to ground. if you wanted to try them you could leave several flowers to fruit. wouldn't hurt anything.
 
Johnny Gisson
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steve bossie wrote:i would put them 2feet apart to give them room to spread. i would pinch them till fall then cut to ground. if you wanted to try them you could leave several flowers to fruit. wouldn't hurt anything.


Thank you.
Godspeed with your Prime Ark's,
I was going to get those but the backyard is full of wild blackberries and raspberries, and now got Heritage and Anne and wanting to save some open space in the yard, wanted to only choose one blackberry variety and went for the largest I can grow Kiowa.
I just might add Prime Ark this year especially if I see in on hand at the nursery, don't want any more thorns really want to go with thornless blackberries and raspberries from now on if I add more varieties. Has to be very big berries so Ark would be great with the Kiowa.
 
steve bossie
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good luck with your annes! if i get some extra shoots next year i can send you some p.a. freedoms if you don't have some by then.
 
Johnny Gisson
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Thanks! I just might take your offer if I decide to go with that variety, maybe trade Kiowa suckers? or wild blackberry but they have thorns but big berries.
I read Ark's give a moderate crop. I am interested to know how they do for you.

Below are the directions I got with the Anne 's I just ordered from Ebay.

Got a bunch of good compost yesterday ..going to plant them today.

Maybe you know all this already but maybe can help someone else too.

-- - - - - - - - - -

http://www.scenichillfarmnursery.com/pages/RaspberryPlantingGrowingPruningTips


RASPBERRY PLANTING, GROWING & PRUNING TIPS

Raspberry Care and Planting Instructions

Plant Care Upon Arrival

Proper care is necessary to insure good growth. Ideally they should be planted immediately, but can be held for several days. Open top of bag, add more moist loose soil & store them in a cool shady place until ready to plant. Care should be taken to avoid allowing the roots to dry out or overheat. Roots & packing mix should be damp but not wet. Too much water will rot the roots.

Site

The most critical factor in site selection is soil type. A deep, well-drained soil of medium to light texture and free of salts is best. Avoid heavy, clay soil and those areas underlaid with a clay or hard pan. If you have clay soil, till in 4 inches of compost and medium size bark chips. Raspberry plants need good soil aeration and are very susceptible to root rots. Raspberry crops can also be planted in raised beds or in large 10 gallon or larger containers for optimum production and drainage. Soils should be prepared before planting and receiving yourroots/plants. If you are growing in containers, only use low salt fertilizers meant for container growing. Thoroughly till the soil and eliminate perennial weed problems. An adequate supply of good quality water for irrigation is essential. Most raspberry plantings have a drip line system installed.


Raspberry plants need at least 6 hours of full sun a day...do not plant in the shade or under a tree. Full sun is best. Rows should go up and down the slope, not across the slope. Mounding up the row before planting will help with drainage. Have 7 to 10 feet between rows. Plants will fill in the row from root suckers, and are usually confined to a hedgerow about 2 feet in width with a 2-3 wire fence on each side of the row. Do not plant raspberries close to the South, West or North sides of a building or house, as the South and West sides will be too hot in the summer and the North side will not get enough sun. In the extreme North, where growing seasons are short, row covers/ plastic on hoops can be used to extend the season in the spring and fall. In areas of cool spring seasons, often the ever bearing(Primocane) varieties are cut to the ground in late winter to eliminate the spring berry crop. In cool spring areas there is not enough heat to produce a good sweet berry in the spring. This puts all of the energy of the plants to produce a larger fall crop.

In the extreme South (Gulf Coast - Arizona - Southern California), plantings should be away from buildings, solid fences and anything that will block air movement. Shade cloth may be necessary to block the hot afternoon sun when temperatures are over 100 degrees.


Do not plant raspberries where there have been planted potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, mint or bulbs in the last 4 years without prior fumigation of the soil. These crops are hosts for the disease Verticillium Wilt, a fungus that can stay in the soil for many years and can infest the raspberry crop. Do not use composts that were made from these plants. Rootstock and dormant bare root plants can be planted whenever the soil temperature is over 35 degrees and the daytime temperature average over 45 degrees. Growing plants can be planted when the soil temperature is over40 degrees and the daytime temperature average over 55 degrees.

Planting Bulk Root Material

Starting raspberries from rootstock is the most economical way to start raspberry plants. All it takes is a little patience and remembering to water regularly. And since your rootstock is “Certified” free of diseases and virus, your raspberry patch should last over 15 years with proper care. If your soil is too wet or cold to till, the raspberry roots can be planted in containers 1 inch deep to root out before they are planted in their permanent location. Place the containers in a sunny warm location. Usually in about 3-4 months after you planted the containers, they are ready to plant in the permanent garden area. One oz. of roots plants 2-4 containers.

Hedgerow planting rate: One ounce should plant 2 1/2 feet of row. It is critical to use the correct amount. For example, if you ordered a 8 oz. package...spread it out on the 20 ft row to produce 24 -36 canes. Too much root material will generate excessive canes. Do not cut apart small roots, plant them as they come from the box - large, thick roots can be cut into 1 foot pieces. The root material is stretched out in the row on top of the soil like a narrow thin rope with a space between each root piece. Too much root material will generate canes too close together. Cover with 1-inch of good soil/compost mix and 1 inch of bark or chips after the canes have emerged. Do not bury the roots any deeper, or you will have fewer canes. The fine root system should not be allowed to dry during the planting process. This can happen very quickly on a warm, windy spring day. Keep soil moist, but not wet after planting, until canes emerge, which can take 5-8 weeks. If your soil dries out at the 1 inch level where the roots are, the roots will die, or you will get fewer canes. Also, the sooner you plant after receiving, the more canes you will get.


Planting Dormant Bare root canes

Bare root canes should be planted no deeper than the plant originally grew, which means covering the roots only with 1-2 inches of a good soil/compost mix. Planting deeper can kill the plant and will reduce the number of new canes you will get. Water in well after planting, and water and fertilize regularly to keep the plant growing rapidly.

Planting Growing Plants

Starter plants in small pots should not be buried any deeper than their surface level. Water in well after planting, and water and fertilize regularly to keep the plant growing rapidly.

Fertilization

Raspberries need good soil fertility for optimum growth and production. Mulching with weed free compost or bark will improve the soil, hold in moisture and keep down weed competition. If you use just bark, add extra N fertilizer, as the decomposing bark will use the available N in the soil. If you do not fertilize, your canes will not develop as they should. You can use chemical or organic fertilizer, but if you use organic, make sure you use enough, since the concentration is much lower. Fertilize yearly for best yields. For a 100 foot row of summer bearing varieties apply 8# of 10-10-10 in the early spring and 6# of 10-10-10 45 days later. For a 100 foot row of fall bearing varieties apply 4.5# of 10-10-10 in early spring, and repeat 45 days later, and again prior to fruiting. Do not apply after mid August to avoid winter injury to tender shoots. Do not mix fertilizer into the soil or pile next to plants. Sprinkle fertilizer in a 2’ wide band over the row, but do not apply 2-3 inches from the raspberry canes or new shoots.Healthy plants will have dark green leaves...if your leaves start to turn light green or yellow, they are short of fertilizer.

A soil test can determine if your soil is deficient of any micronutrients. The soil pH should be from 5.6 to 6.3

Training

A 2-3 wire fence on each side of the row should be installed to keep the canes upright when full of heavy berries. The lower wire would be 2 feet off the ground and the upper wire should be 3.5 foot off the ground. Use No. 10 or 12 galvanized wires stretched along posts 20 feet apart. The end posts are anchored or braced since they get the most of the pull. We recommend that all raspberries be supported.

Irrigation

Raspberries need at least 1 inch of water per week for fruit and plant growth. In hotter weather, water more.

Training and Pruning Floricane (Summer Bearing) Varieties

Cascade Delight

Latham

Saanich

Tulameen

Floricane (summer bearing) varieties carry one crop of fruit on two year-old canes during the summer months.After the first season's growth, tie canes to the first wire of the fence/trellis wire. In the following seasons, canes that have produced fruit should be cut out at the end of harvest. Canes should be cut as close to the soil as possible.

The number of canes each plant can support is decided by soil fertility, moisture, and planting distance. Keep all good strong canes each plant will produce. This may mean 8, 10, or with exceptionally good growing conditions, as many as 12 canes per 1 1/2 foot of row. Tie the canes to the top fence/trellis wire. Canes are usually cut back to 4 1⁄2 to 5 1⁄2 feet tall to increase berry size. Postpone cutting canes back or tipping them until late winter or early spring after the danger of hard freezes has passed.

Training and Pruning Primocane Fall (Ever bearing) Varieties

Anne

Autumn Britten

Caroline

Fall Gold

Heritage

Primocane fruiting (ever bearing) varieties fruit on canes that come up each year. Fences/trellis keeps the fruit off the ground and maintains good aeration of the planting for good disease control. Primocane varieties start fruiting in late summer and will produce until the first hard frost. When the crop is over and the canes have dropped their leaves, cut or mow all canes to the ground. If you want the canes to catch snow in the winter, do not cut down canes until late winter. Cut as close to the soil surface as possible, leaving no stubs. In warm spring areas a spring crop is also possible if you do not mow down in the fall or late winter.
 
steve bossie
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thanks for the offer scott but they won't survive in zone 3b. thats why I'm excited about p.a. freedoms because i can grow primocanes as a fall crop and cut the canes to the ground for winter. no worrying about cane survival. got them in my raised beds with a hoop over them to help them grow faster. if they do well , next year i may do another bed with p.a. traveler which is the newest release from dr. clark. i love blackberries!
 
Johnny Gisson
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I love blackberries too.
I feel incredible after eating a bunch. They are super healthy!

I am having a problem with one of my Heritage plants all of a sudden.
pictures here.
http://www.permies.com/t/56050/plants/Raspberry-leaves-yellow-dying-suddenly#468527
 
steve bossie
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yes they are. I'm growing just about all the super fruits for the north in my yard. i have aronia, seaberry, honey berry, blueberry, elderberry, goumi, autumn olive, juneberry, black currants and black mulberry besides my raspberry and blackberry patches. i have several varieties for each berry. i also have 2 varieties of apple trees and 2 v of rhubarb and 2 hazelnut bushes. i shouldn't have to buy any fruits once these all start producing which is good as fresh anything esp. fruits are expensive and are old by time they get up here. all planted on what was once a 1/2 acre of lawn. i see grass as a waste of good land!
 
steve bossie
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sorry i missed the problem you were having in this post. i posted on the other post you started. i hope i can help! nothing worse than loosing a healthy plant to unknown circumstances! hang in there!
 
Johnny Gisson
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steve bossie wrote:
yes they are. I'm growing just about all the super fruits for the north in my yard. i have aronia, seaberry, honey berry, blueberry, elderberry, goumi, autumn olive, juneberry, black currants and black mulberry besides my raspberry and blackberry patches. i have several varieties for each berry. i also have 2 varieties of apple trees and 2 v of rhubarb and 2 hazelnut bushes. i shouldn't have to buy any fruits once these all start producing which is good as fresh anything esp. fruits are expensive and are old by time they get up here. all planted on what was once a 1/2 acre of lawn. i see grass as a waste of good land!

sorry i missed the problem you were having in this post. i posted on the other post you started. i hope i can help! nothing worse than loosing a healthy plant to unknown circumstances! hang in there!


Thanks Steve.
You have my dream growing in your yard.
I cant believe your growing chokeberry. Do they taste like another familiar berry?
What about goumi?
Does that taste like cherries?
 
steve bossie
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ill let you know. i planted them last spring. i may get a few berries on some of these, to try this summer as they grew a lot last year. fruits are very expensive up here so I'm growing these out of necessity. i plan to freeze some whole and make jam and juice with the rest. i shouldn't need to buy fruit once these guys start producing a full crop.
 
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