• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • James Freyr
  • Greg Martin
  • Dave Burton
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Dan Boone

glass at wheaton labs

 
steward
Posts: 28080
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Missoula no longer accepts glass for recycling.

What if we set aside a spot at the bone yard at the lab to collect unbroken glass for construction materials? When there is enough, I would think it could be used in many ways. Interior cob walls could allow light to penetrate.

 
gardener
Posts: 6066
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
929
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, That would be cool for unbroken glass. You could also build a rocket furnace and recycle the broken glass with a glass blow pipe, you would also need an annealing cabinet to slowly cool the glass pieces you made from the old glass.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
240
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What's with the no more recycling glass ? It's a big biz here in France . Why should it be different where you are ?
But melting it down just to make bricks would be cool .

David
 
Posts: 15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
about 40 years ago, it was common to see glass driveways around here (Sea)
It was small pieces of glass that had been heated to soften the edges.
As a teen, I thought it was cool, all the bright colorful driveways.
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28080
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tom Robertson wrote:about 40 years ago, it was common to see glass driveways around here (Sea)
It was small pieces of glass that had been heated to soften the edges.
As a teen, I thought it was cool, all the bright colorful driveways.



Tom, can you find any pics on the net and post them here? I looked and only found stuff where a little glass was mixed in with cement.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
244
forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://swamplot.com/the-recycled-glass-driveway-at-the-cordell-shipping-container-house/2009-01-14/
This one has glass mixed with a binding resin

http://www.drivewayguide.com/driveway-types/glass-driveway/ This site has a little information about the process.

I've seen tumbled glass used as a garden mulch, also. Might be an attractive alternative for foot paths. Not seeing any driveways without a binding agent, yet.

It also occurs to me that the grass paving systems could be filled with glass instead of soil. This might be an option if you've got really shallow soils and are putting in a new driveway. Move the topsoil to a garden area when you build the driveway instead of trying to grow ground cover beneath a car.
 
Posts: 177
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Broken glass thrown in a cement mixer for a while to dull the edges would have a lot of uses such as decorative gravel for paths, mixed in with plasters, etc.
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 28080
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We now have a rocket kiln ... I am thinking about making glass tiles.
 
Casie Becker
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
244
forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe not for the labs, but I bet tumbled glass would also be a great substrate in wicking beds. In Austin is is apparently a free resource if you're willing to load it yourself.
 
You save more money with a clothesline than dozens of light bulb purchases. Tiny ad:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!