I just dropped the price of
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uses include:
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- find the needle
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Which countries are good options for greener life?  RSS feed

 
Esmee Silver
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Hello,

We are a couple from the Germany and are wanting to live a more simple and calm life. We are looking at countries where we can move relatively easily with a EU pasport. Our idea is to start a homestead/hostel/community/family. One of us has a Masters degree. But we are really not interested in working an official job. Ideally, we would like to live in Tasmania or New Zealand, but for such countries one needs to have a job offer and work fulltime. For us this is not an option. We have worked the last years to save up & now it is time to retreat a bit. A few hectares would be ideal (and we can build a simple house), or an older house with at least 5000-10.000 m2.

These are factors we consider per country:
-Relatively easy visa process
-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
-Temperate climate
-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
-Climate change influence...?
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).

Considering these factors, which of these countries could you recommend (or not)?
Or maybe tips for other countries/regions?

-Bulgaria
-Slovakia
-Czech
-Ukraine (hills, north west)
-Poland (hills, south)
-Baltic country
-Finland
-Northern Spain
-Central Portugal
-Azores
-Mexico
-Chile
-Ecuador
-Brazil
-Paraguay
-Costa Rica
-Philippines
-Thailand
 
Rene Nijstad
Posts: 184
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Hij Esmée,

We're in Colombia, i think if you pick the right region most criteria you list will be met. I put up some posts with more info. See my signature below for the links.
 
Charli Wilson
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You'll struggle to own land in Thailand without being a Thai National- foreigners aren't allowed to own land. There are ways around it ,like buying through a Ltd company, but that does make things difficult.
 
r ranson
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I think every country has potential. Everywhere I've visited has pockets of pure perfection and lots of little things wrong with it.

For me, Europe has a huge appeal because of the cultural traditions and history, but also because of their strict food labeling practices. If I have to buy food, then I want to know what's in it. In North America, many of my allergens are labeled under creative wording, so I have to know the science behind how it was made, as well as where it was made to discover the likeliness of it being something I cannot eat. I also appreciated any country that doesn't believe eggs need to be refrigerated. I would love the challenging of stewarding land in Spain or thereabouts. With the upcoming climate forecasts, I think a bit of Fukuoka plus a whole lot of Permaculture, might be able to reverse some of the damage. If one were to start greening up a little patch of paradise while everything else goes brown... and be successful, then I think it would have a positive influence. I remember there were some villages for sale for reasonable prices there a while back.

Not too much pollution and chemtrails


"New World" countries often have vast areas away from industry and pollution. Weather patterns can move air pollution pretty far, and water moves downhill. So this is going to be pretty localized. How you set up your property can also influence how it purifies the air and water - think of the temples in the heart of Tokyo and other large Japanese cities. I found the air very difficult in the big cities, but step through the temple gate, and suddenly I can breathe with clarity.

-Climate change influence...?


There are a lot of models on how the climate will change, but in the end we don't know what's going to happen until it does. Thank goodness you found a permaculture site. This whole style of living and growing things focuses on resilience. There are techniques for greening desserts, reducing floods, and growing food in all manner of situations. To that end...

-Temperate climate
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).


Enough for what style of growing? There are people here who grow all the food they need and much more, on just a touch of rain. I think it's all about finding the right technique for the area you are (another permaculture tool). Places with 'standard' agricultural sun and rain, are probably going to be more expensive than marginal weather patterns. My personal plan is to acquire some marginal land in my area (which has 6 months drought every summer - more or less frost date to frost date) and make the land splendid and fertile. I'm practicing my skills now, so I can be ready. The rest of the farms around me are already irrigating heavily, and my dry-land polyculture is still lush and green. By doing most of my growing during the cold season, I can grow my staple foods while other's vacation, and during the hot season, while others struggle with the weather, I sit back and work on cottage industry things.

-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).



I don't know about other countries, but in North America, many of the rules and regulations are regional. Other rules are only rules if someone sees them being broken. Everywhere has rules, finding a place that matches your values will be the key. Most rules can usually be gotten around. Can't build cob? But I can build post and beam... so how about wattle and daub? It's a matter of adjusting ones dreams to match the local requirements - like adjusting ones building and gardening practices to match the local resources.

My friend in Canada raises her children without vaccinations, but this will cause problems, I'm told, if she ever wants to send them to school, which she doesn't, so she's fine with that. Although she has this right, there is a lot of social and medical pressure to vaccinate. By showing she's done the research (as in can quote peer review papers on demand and actually relevant), as well as appearing level headed about it (shows she understands the popular point of view), she can get through it. The other option is to not vaccinate because of religious reasons, which needs to be a recognized religion.

-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.


I'm not seeing a stream of immigrants something to avoid. Individual bad apples may creep in, but that happens with any group of people. About half my friends are immigrants of one sort or another, moving of peoples is common place here. I find I get more benefit from interacting with people from foreign lands, than people who share my common upbringing. Different technologies, world views, mmm, delicious food cultures... There are so many benefits immigrants bring. Some of these people possibly left their home unwillingly. Some of them left in fear of their lives. Many of the recent war immigrants here, had as much or better standard of living than the general populous here... yet they are treated as if they are only here because they are too poor to get a job back home. That's horrid. No. I see immigrants as a valuable resource; a source of friendship, knowledge and inspiration.

Please remember, what you propose to become an immigrant yourself. Many communities will be suspicious of you at first, no matter where you move.

Stable Country. There is no easy way to predict this. What is stable today; might falter tomorrow.


Finding a country that matches your values 100% will be, I suspect, impossible. That's true for everyone. Finding out what's most important to you, and use that. Many of the other things can be adjusted later (either by adjusting your wants, or by creating an environment that meets them - I want to make a shirt out of locally grown cotton, cotton doesn't grow this far north, I'm working on creating cotton that will grow here... it's either that, or adjust my wants to make it out of linen, which grows marvelously well here).
 
Dale Hodgins
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Instead of looking for a country with no stream of immigrants, search out those who have targeted immigration. Rather than simply accepting everyone who wishes to apply, some countries have found that a targeted approach works better.

I wish my country would do this. We have many immigrants from the Philippines. I have never met one who wasn't a working, productive member of society. With other groups, we haven't been so lucky. Mine is a highly unpopular point of view. I think most public policy things are based on popularity, rather than long-term benefit.
 
Esmee Silver
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hi Rene, your place and posts sound interesting to us. I just looked into residency options for Colombia. It seems the one that is applicable for us would be the Investment Visa (T7):

''Investment visa (TP-7) – for a foreigner who invests in property or a business in Colombia. For property investments, Colombia requires an investment that is more than 350 times the minimum wage in Colombia or more than $73,346. For business investments, Colombia requires an investment that is no less than 100 times the minimum wage in Colombia or no less than $20,956.''

As we would be investing in property, it seems our budget would be too low. Do you know ways around this?
 
Seva Tokarev
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Esmee Silver wrote:
-Ukraine (hills, north west)


There is a civil war in Ukraine since 2014, it's hardly a "safe and stable country" right now and in foreseeable future.
Even though NW is less affected.

Esmee, I am curious, what do you not like about your present place?
Perhaps that will help answer your question.
 
Esmee Silver
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R Ranson, thank you for your thorough response.
We also prefer Europe over North America; regarding food but also culture and people. North America has some beautiful nature though, especially the NW Pacific.
But anyways, immigration to Canada or US would be difficult for us since we dont have any career going on. Also wouldnt be within our budget anyways.
Regarding 'enough rainfall'... this has not only to do with gardening. But also climates we prefer. It gives the air a fresh feel and makes us feel good. In dry climates, I have had problems breathing (Perth, Texas, Morocco).
For us, certain streams of immigrants or minorities can be something to avoid. This is our opinion and experience and I am not here to discuss that specific topic
However an example that is not political of nature and wont offend anyone could be, combining the topic of climate change and refugees... where would 156 million Bangladesh people go if the country would be flooded (if that were to happen due to climate change)? This can pose a problem to neighbouring countries, perhaps even Thailand.
Yes, it will be hard to find a country that suits us 100%.
 
Esmee Silver
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hi Seva, we are from Netherlands & Germany.
What we do not like there:

- rules for everything
- too many people
- expensive property/land
- too many chemtrails / no proper blue skies
- most people focussed on career, and no open mind on alternatives.
- Germany has more nature and space, but it is above our budget & we dont want to spend our lives working !

 
Rene Nijstad
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Esmee Silver wrote:hi Rene, your place and posts sound interesting to us. I just looked into residency options for Colombia. It seems the one that is applicable for us would be the Investment Visa (T7):

''Investment visa (TP-7) – for a foreigner who invests in property or a business in Colombia. For property investments, Colombia requires an investment that is more than 350 times the minimum wage in Colombia or more than $73,346. For business investments, Colombia requires an investment that is no less than 100 times the minimum wage in Colombia or no less than $20,956.''

As we would be investing in property, it seems our budget would be too low. Do you know ways around this?


Hi Esmee,

When I got here first I used the business option, it was then called business partner, business owner visa, with the same requirements: 100 minimum monthly salaries. The get 'around' it is that they're not very picky about how you invest that. So what you could do is open a business (I can advise on that process too) and buy the farm as part of the new business. The thing is that this visa is personal. Your partner can get a partner visa, which the does not allow working, but since you'll be on a farm out of view means you can pretty much do what you like. After 5 years on the business owner visa you can apply for a qualified resident visa which lifts any requirements. There are a few other ways, but that would be slightly more complicated.

If you would like to check out the area here send me a PM. I have more info to share as well, but i would not like everything to be public on the forum.
 
John Weiland
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@Esmee S.: "-Climate change influence...? "

Maybe make use of the positive side of this? What are the settlement requirements in western Greenland? (You had Finland on the list which may have a similar latitude?) Too many stories to count about what the warming trend is doing, in a positive way, to agricultural possibilities especially if you were additionally amenable to greenhouse plant production: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-greenland-climate-agriculture-idUSBRE92P0EX20130326 Not sure what accessing water is like....some talk of it actually being an issue even with the streams coming off the ice. You might be able to take advantage of the warming trend and would probably be long gone before the climate trended in the opposite direction.
 
Seva Tokarev
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Have you considered "unrecognized states" like Transnistria (between Moldova and Ukraine) and Abkhazia (between Russia and Georgia)?
Not on the top of "safe and stable" list (both have seceded after violent conflicts, but that ended about 1993, more than 20 years ago,) but otherwise I think meet your criteria.
You loose some, you gain some.

(I don't know if it will work for you - please do your own research; it might be not the best idea altogether; but these names are not even on the map and maybe that's why you never thought of it.)

In Transnistria, 0.5% of its half-million population are German, according to Demographics of Moldova; 0.08% are Gypsies, compared to 1.5% in Bulgaria. I wonder what is the best way of getting there though, as it land locked (except via Dniestr river,) and civil aviation does not fly there anymore; I imagine with EU passport the easiest way is through Moldova. Have never been there myself.

Abkhazia lost 60% of its population in the 1990s (for one thing, Georgians, who used to be the majority, fled in large numbers,) so I imagine land is available. From what I hear, is a very nice place to visit (but I only have been there twice as a child in 1980s.) Wide variety of climate zones there. Has ports on Black Sea. Ancient tradition (Germany is young compared to it,) which you definitely need to take in consideration; I would double check with the locals about wearing tank tops (though hospitality there, and in the region, is fabulous.)
 
Steven Kovacs
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Seva,

"Frozen conflicts" have a habit of thawing abruptly. See: South Ossetia, Nagorno Karabakh, etc. I personally would want to stay as far away as possible from places like Transnistria, especially given other events in Ukraine in the last few years.
 
Lori Dorchak
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Location: Patagonia
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Hi Esmee
My husband and I and 3 of our children left the US three years ago for Chile because
There are rules for everything
- too many people
- expensive property/land
- too many chemtrails / no proper blue skies
- most people focused on career, and no open mind on alternatives.
and a few other reasons particular to us but we chose Chile because
Relatively easy visa process
-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
-Temperate climate
-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
-Climate change influence...?
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).
Hah! Sorry I just cut and pasted casue I'm in a rush but you get the picture
Visit my website ourchileanadventure.org It is just my blog/journal about living here in the south of Chile
Hope no one will mind if i put that in
and I'd love to chat more if you are interested
 
Esmee Silver
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@ Seva & Steven: I think I agree that I would not like to live in a 'frozen conflict'. We had considered the country Georgia, as it is beautiful & good climate. But the political situation of some areas is not as appealing.
@Lori: I will send you a PM soon!
 
Lori Dorchak
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One more interesting plus for the Los Lagos region of Chile for you, Esmee, is that in 1860 thousands of German families were invited by the Chilean government to settle this region.
So today we have the german school and the german club, lots of kuchen, german architecture, and many germanic looking people who still speak german.
Chile is the most stable country in SA. the economy is prosperous. it is not the cheapest place to live as far as SA goes but you may find it cheaper than Europe esp. down in the south of Chile.
Homeschooling is legal. Vaccinations not shoved down your throat. No GMO but not much organics either. We are building our off grid farm in the country with no permits and no inspections.
It's a gentler slower pace of life down here and the people are kind and friendly.
You couldn't pay me to live anywhere in or near Europe. Too much civil unrest. Here all is tranquilo.
 
Steven Kovacs
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Esmee,

Do you speak the language(s) of any of the places you're looking at? As immigrants to a new country, that would be a big plus.
 
r ranson
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One option is, depending on the country, some places encourage farmers to come and settle, some go so far as not only fund the visa and offer financial aid to set up the land you've bought. In some Countries, this is done regionally (not by the federal government). If farming is in your future, this might be something to look into.
 
John Friedrich
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Estonia! (Estland)


As German-EU citizens you can live and get land there with little problem. 48% of the land is still forested, and Estonians value nature and privacy, and there are still some cultural connections with Germans. Of course eastern Poland is closer for you.
 
Tom Nicholson
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Location: London, England
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@Lori Dorchak ourchileanadventure.org is "parked" when I visit - no content there.

It's probably off your radar, but eastern Russia has land going for free

https://www.rt.com/politics/338775-duma-committee-approves-bill-introducing/
 
ties Lahlali
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Hey Esmee,

My wife and I are both from The Netherlands and just returned after living in Thailand for nearly a decade.

Although we had a great time there we felt enough was enough and we wanted to move closer to family and live in a place without visa issues and other bs. Especially since we have kids this felt like a good idea.

We are now preparing to scout Portugal and Spain with a camper van and are set to leave in about 6 weeks.

Drop me a line if you are interested in sparring some ideas. It seems like we are on the same page.

We also have a blog and youtube chanel called "Healthy Roots and Strong Wings"
To document our adventures and entertain friends and family

Greetings,

Ties
 
Hugh Holland
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Hello Esmee, I seen Costa Rica on your list and wondered have you considered Belize? It is the only English speaking country in Central America and has large amounts of German speakers, due to the Anabaptist immigrations that still continue today. Mainly from the US, Canada and some South American countries. Three different German dialects are spoken High, Low and Pennsylvania Dutch. In the town Spanish Lookout between the capital of Belmopan and the Guatemalan border, just about all its inhabitants speak German, as the town is founded by Mennonites. I spoke with a German family who moved to Belize a number of years ago and they love it. Homeschooling was a major issue for them, as was affordable land. It is my understanding that Belize has pretty relaxed immigration laws. Coming from the EU, you do not need a visa to enter. Check out the Qualified Retired Persons Incentive Act to see if you qualify. It is a beautiful country, eco-friendly and affordable.
 
nikos pappas
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i know it's gonna sound crazy but why don't you come to Greece?
there are places in Greece so not touched by industry/pollution etc. that you ll be amazed. i bet that you are thinking that i am crazy but think about it:
A) because of the geography of the land you have many choices of microclimate (northern Greece is totally different from south say Peloponese, or the Ionian islands vs Aegean and so on)
B) depending on where you plan to stay (suburban, small town, rural or even in an abandonned village) you can buy some land with 3000-5000 euros (or even cheaper but there is a lot of "it depends" in this issue)
C) most Greeks are English-speaking and many of them German speaking
D) no matter in which part you choose to live there is an airport close by(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airports_in_Greece) and most european cities are 2-3 hours away (low-cost and mainstream airlines, you can fly to Berlin from Crete for 50 euros)
E) if you stay away from major cities there is zero danger of violence etc.
F) you can live in one of the most ecological diverse places, believe it or not there are over 5,500 species of plants of which over 1,000 are endemic in Greece (http://old.biol.uoa.gr/zoolmuseum/biodiven.htm)
G) mediterranean climate, sunshine but no extremes (again it depends on location)
H) Greece is a crazy place to be, but is safe from terrorist attacks or muslim extremism.
I) part of the EU (still), with it's pros and cons
J)227 islands to choose from (more than 1000 inhabited islands, if you want to play solo ...)

I don't believe that one can predict nationwide stability and safety in any country. these are social/political phenomena with different impact in different parts of a country (big cities and small towns). Do you believe that America is safe?France?a country in south America or southeast- Asia? there are always black swan events that bring things upside down.
no matter what happens however,even war, there are gonna be places untouched by violence and places burnt to the ground in any country

P.S. i know that is a matter of perspective but you want to immigrate to some place with not many immigrants? dude you are an immigrant yourself, realise it and try to cooperate!

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Hi Esmee.
I don't want to start a discussion or try to change your point of view, only want to give my reaction. Until not so long ago I wanted to leave the Netherlands and start a permaculture project (incl. eco-camping) in a (sub-)tropical country. But now my opinion is changing ... I see my permaculture garden ('future miniature food-forest') here is going in the right direction. I can pick something to eat here daily (not yet a total meal, but it's only May now ...). And, even better, I see more and more people getting interested in permaculture here in this region. We are starting a community permaculture garden (edible & educative) in this neighbourhood! With help from the Town-council!
For me this shows: now is not the time to leave from here!
"The times they are a-changing'!
 
Lori Dorchak
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http://www.ourchileanadventure.org/

Try this
I don't know how to put a link in
 
Lori Dorchak
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Well, I guess I did know!
and it works
 
rowan eisner
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Hi, I can answer a bit about Costa Rica:

-Relatively easy visa process
Not too bad, if you meet the criteria. Can show $60k for a couple (so you can afford to retire). May have gone up in the last few years.

-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
You could build something basic for that, but not in a convenient location

-Temperate climate
It's tropical but most people live at altitude (eg in the central valley). Eg where we live in monteverde was 17-22 degrees year round.

-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
Yep

-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
Apart from those pesky north americans and europeans, you mean

-Climate change influence...?
Well, where we were cloud forest was turning into rainforest but still good for a long time

-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
It's good but some part growing in tunnels really helps (too much rain sometimes)

-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).
Lots of libertarians

They also have a strong ecological and peace ethic.
 
Jotham Bessey
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Have you checked into Canada's Atlantic provinces? Especially the Island of Newfoundland. Might be able to move there just by showing you won't be an extra burden (no need for work)
All Atlantic provinces will meet all your listed requirements (Pollution is almost nil where I am) Also the Island of Newfoundland has the best wind resource in north America.

If you are worried about effects of climate change, stay away from the Azores, Philippians, and the Black sea coast. Brazil and Southern Chile should be good choices. Finland and said Atlantic provinces are two places that will feel serious effects of climate change the least.
 
Sebastian Köln
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How about staying in Germany and help to change the situation towards your goals?

-Relatively easy visa process:
you already have the passport

-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
I want to start an permaculture institute in my town using Bill Mollison's legal model (see the last section of the Permaculture Pamphlets and in the PDM chapter 14 (on youtube at 59 minutes).
It involves a lot of paperwork and juristic work, but could end up with little monetary requirements for the individual

-Temperate climate
-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.

The environment here is still in a relatively good condition and there is already work being done to improve it.

-Climate change influence...?
While there are heavy storms and floods around us, they appear to avoid our place.

-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
Over the year there is enough rain and sun. But you would have to store the water and use the sun efficient during the winter.

-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).
Build your own school. There are a few free schools around here, and there is room fore more.
For the medical part, there are ways around vaccinations (make the authorities responsible for eventual consequences; and nobody will enforce it)

If you dedicate your live to improve the environment, you will probably get the land for free.
 
Nina Jay
Posts: 85
Location: Southern Finland, mean annual temp +4 C, rainfall 700 mm, growing season 180 days, clay soil.
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Esmee Silver wrote:


These are factors we consider per country:
-Relatively easy visa process
-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
-Temperate climate
-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
-Climate change influence...?
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).

-

I'll try and reply something about my native country, Finland, since it was on the list  
Visa process no problem as you come from another EU country
For 30 000 euros you may get a small piece of land in Southern Finland, if you're very lucky, but no house on it. Northern Finland is much cheaper but even there I'm not sure if you'd get a decent house.
Temperate climate only the in the southern coastal areas. Colder  (hemiboreal zone, boreal zone & subarctic zone) elsewhere.
Not too much pollution and chemtrails. Unless you decide to buy land near Talvivaara gold mine in Northern Finland or similar place... there are polluted areas like that but for the most part, Finland is pretty clean.
A safe and stable country and no huge streams of immigrants. Finland is probably among the safest countries in the world.
Climate change will probably benefit Finland's agriculture making the winters milder and the growing season longer.
Enough rain (too much rain is more common than not enough)
Not enough sun! Long dark winters. The summer is nice but short. There are statistically eight really warm days in a Finnish summer (sunny, temperature over +25C). Yes, only eight days of really warm weather.
Too many rules and regulations in my opinion. But I don't think vaccinations are compulsory and home schooling is  possible.

I hope you move to Finland and if you do, do visit us 

 
Henry Coulder
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Czech Republic was on the list. I can offer anyone to stay for free and don't claim to know everything about it. If you need to do more here or know anyone, let me know.

Click my links in my signature below for an idea of what I mean.
 
Tom Tomas
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Esmee Silver wrote:Hello,

We are a couple from the Germany and are wanting to live a more simple and calm life. We are looking at countries where we can move relatively easily with a EU pasport. Our idea is to start a homestead/hostel/community/family. One of us has a Masters degree. But we are really not interested in working an official job. Ideally, we would like to live in Tasmania or New Zealand, but for such countries one needs to have a job offer and work fulltime. For us this is not an option. We have worked the last years to save up & now it is time to retreat a bit. A few hectares would be ideal (and we can build a simple house), or an older house with at least 5000-10.000 m2.

These are factors we consider per country:
-Relatively easy visa process
-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
-Temperate climate
-Not too much pollution and chemtrails
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
-Climate change influence...?
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).

Considering these factors, which of these countries could you recommend (or not)?
Or maybe tips for other countries/regions?

-Bulgaria
-Slovakia
-Czech
-Ukraine (hills, north west)
-Poland (hills, south)
-Baltic country
-Finland
-Northern Spain
-Central Portugal
-Azores
-Mexico
-Chile
-Ecuador
-Brazil
-Paraguay
-Costa Rica
-Philippines
-Thailand


Definitely AZORES (PORTUGAL) but not São Miguel, because PICO (second largest island) has better views of the other two nearby islands and real estate is cheaper. You can buy a house on PICO (needs work) for 20000€ and you can by land for as little as 500€ per hectare if you are willing to collect stones and work on it. When you are on Pico then let's meet. Pico has climate between 10C and 30C which is very mild cool-tropical climate and you can grow anything year round. There is no freezing and no hot weather in the Azores and the lowest it can get within lower elevations is 10C. Now if you climb the peak of the Pico mountain, it can get some snow in winter, but no one lives beyond 200m above sea level in the Azores. The Pico mountain is 2300 m tall.

I can give you a separate apartment for 150€ a month if you pay the extra electricity that you may use and usually basic electricity and water is included in the 150€, but you must buy your own gas for water heating and cooking which may cost you another 20€ per month. If you want a TV, cable, DSL, interenet, you arrange the local company and pay to them directly as those are not included in this cheap rent. The apartment is a stunning natural stone basement apartment.
 
Lincoln Zaegen
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Location: Clifton, Texas
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Esmee Silver wrote:
-Max. 30.000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land.
-A safe and stable country. Preferably no stream of immigrants.
-Climate change influence...?
-Enough rain and sun (for gardening & solar energy).
-Not too many rules and regulations. (for instance, forcing kids to go to school or get vaccinations etc).


GOOD LUCK! You'll need it!

In the United States, with only "30000 EUR for a piece of land or house with some land" you are VERY limited.
North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming will be your main choices.
In these states, crime rate is VERY VERY LOW.
not many regulations, either.

I'm really curious to know what you will find.
 
Simon Flygare
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Hi Tom, do you know of any current land for sale on Pico within the 500-1000€ range per hectare?
A friend and I, have been looking for land to do some permaculture and the Azores looks like the perfect place for doing so.
 
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