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Honeycomb on honeycomb

 
Amos Rebecca
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Hi everyone. Fairly new beekeeper here. I went to check on my new hive this afternoon and they have started building comb between the slats to the point the slats are now stuck together. . Almost like a second layer on top of the initial layer. I've done some research and haven't been able to find any advice on whether or not I need to cut this extra later off or not. Any advice will do.
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David Livingston
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This is very common . What you do about it depends on your philosophy of bee-keeping and what type of hive you have

David
 
Amos Rebecca
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What would you do David? I don't want to disrupt the hive any more than I already have while getting them arranged. I removed a couple of the empty slats in an effort to give them more room, and added a top half hive, but I worry so much!
 
David Livingston
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Ok a couple of questions
What type of hive have you got ?
How old is it ?
Where are you ?
Have you a mentor ?

David
 
David Livingston
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This looks like bridging comb and it used by the bees to either connect parts of the hive for their own reasons maybe to do with heat ( we don't really know ) or it could be used to hide queen cups .
Neither constitute an emergency
If you need to inspect that part of the hive then you have to chip away at this with your hive tool .
Me with my warre hive I don't bother as I don't do that sort of inspection I let the bees do what they want . They know what they are doing I don't know what the F @@@ they are up to most of the time . But that's cool

David
 
Todd Parr
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David Livingston wrote: They know what they are doing I don't know what the F @@@ they are up to most of the time . But that's cool
David


That pretty well sums up my entire beekeeping philosophy right there.
 
John Master
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i would make sure the queen is not in the mess you are working with, try to smoke the bees away from it as well and knock off any comb that is not built right. I have had bees build crazy shapes and connect stuff together and as much as I am a "let the bees be bees and do their thing" kind of guy I am also aware that if you are in a hive inspecting and it is a burr comb mess you have a likelihood of crushing the queen while trying to slide frames in and out while inspecting. once your frames are all built out correctly they tend not to mess them up and only but random burr comb on the tops or bottoms of frames (much easier to address when you inspect them).
 
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