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Pressure canning pulses  RSS feed

 
r ranson
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It was mentioned on the cooking with dry beans and peas thread, that we can pressure cook dry beans, right in the jar, so that they are ready to eat at a moment's notice.

Anyone done this?

There seems to be two ways, first is to put the dry beans in the jars and fill with water.


The other is to partly cook the beans first.


What I would like to do is to pre-soak the beans, then pack them in the jars and pressure can them. Is it possible?

I know just enough about canning to know that I need to follow a recipe to be safe. Do you have any recipes you like for this kind of thing?
 
R Scott
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I haven't done it yet, but saved this bookmark for when I do.

http://gnowfglins.com/2014/10/27/how-to-can-beans-the-nourishing-way/
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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The recipe in the Ball Blue Book for canning dried beans is:

Combine beans and water.
Bring to boil for 2 minutes. Let soak for 1 hour.
Rinse.
Add water and boil for 30 minutes.
Pack into jars leaving 1" headspace.
Add cooking broth or water.
Pressure cook.
 
teresa quintero
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I cook beans regularly in the crockpot. I will be making them from now this way as I have a pressure canner, and limited freezer space here.

I wish canning would work after drying fruits/veges.
 
r ranson
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One of the things I'm wondering is that when cooking different pulses, they need different cooking times. Even in a pressure cooker, adzuki beans need about 5 min, whereas chickpeas need 14 (from soaked). But these recipes all have the same time for cooking the beans. Do we need to take this into account when canning beans?
 
Thekla McDaniels
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When pressure canning, remember that the time in the pressure cooker is based on attaining food safety, not cooking til done. I am kind of careful about "doing things my own way" when it comes to canning. There is a recipe for dry beans in the ball blue book, but I don't want to do the "extra" steps.

I have just put the washed dried beans in the jar (1/4-1/3 cup in a pint jar with 1/4 teaspoon of salt) then fill with water leaving 1/2 inch head space and at altitude 5200 feet, canned at 15 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes. That's more time than the ball blue book says, but I haven't done the pre cook thing. This way the beans don't always come out evenly distributed in the jar, there are beans packed tight in the bottom of the jar.

To get around this, I have filled the jars in the evening, let them sit (essentially soaking the beans) overnight, then in the morning, shake them up so they are more evenly distributed in the jar, and and a little water to return to the proper headspace, then can them at 15# for 90 minutes, that works better.

When my children were small, I found a pork and beans recipe and put a piece of pork and some spices piece of garlic piece of onion, tomato juice in there did the 90 minute thing, and that was the basis for a good bean soup.

Mostly I just do plain beans now. I only can beans in the winter so that I am using the energy twice, once to cook the beans and once to heat the house.

If I were to can lentils, I would still do the 90 minutes at 15 pounds (at my elevation) for pint size jars, because that is the right time and pressure to kill the botulinum spores all the way in the center of the jar... when it is not a brothy liquid but a thick thing that will impede the circulation of heat throughout thw whole jar.

So, lentlis would probably cook all the way to mush, maybe not what you want form your lentils, but since they cook so fast anyway, it's not that much of an advantage to have them precooked.

Living at high elevation, it's hard to get dry beans to cook, so using the pressure canner cooks the beans better in a shorter period of time.

If you don't already have a copy of the Ball canning book, I highly recommend it. It is a great reference. If I want to add pork to my beans, I can check what is the time required for each, then can the mixture for the length of time required for the food that takes the longest, keeping in mind the other thing about the texture. Solid thick things are going to require more time than thin juicy liquid where the contents of the jar circulates easily, there by transferring the heat, and the temperature of the contents rises uniformly.

But as I said, I err on the side of caution. Because I can the beans for 90 minutes, I just can't feel comfortable canning chicken broth for less than 90 minutes.
 
Hans Quistorff
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Growing up we canned green beans packing them in the jar raw. My job was to cut them in 1 inch chunks and pack them in the jar and add the salt and water. My mother did the pressure canning so I don't remember the pressure and timing but that came from the book anyway. When they cooled I would take them to the root cellar and store them on shelves with the other canned goods. My mother would count how many were coming for dinner and order one quart for each person so the more company we had the more variety we had on the table.
Then there was the peas! My mother would blanch the pods and I was given the task of putting the stem end between the rollers of the washing machine wringer which would pop the peas out of the pods. The peas tended to be over cooked when pressure caned so when we got the freezer we transitioned to freezing them.
The freezer is another story of community. My father was an excellent carpenter who who was working with an excellent refrigeration man who could not saw a board straight. So my father built two 40 cubic foot freezers and the refrigeration man installed the freezer plates and compressors. Two years later he was reassigned and gave us his freezer so we had two f them and by that time had more meet animals so we were freezing our meet instead of canning it.
Any way that is the way things were done 70 years ago.
 
John Polk
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The USDA Canning Guide (PDF) may be downloaded for free. It is broken into eight sections, which must be downloaded seperately. Or, just download the Vegetable canning guide, which includes beans/peas.
 
wayne nicol
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so heres my question about canning- now normally this might be a moot point on a cooking network etc, but on the permie forum- hoping to get an idea- how healthy is canning for one- with the plastic lining to the jar lids??
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Hi Wayne,
At this point, that's up for conjecture. The plastic reusable lids are free of an identified food contaminant, but I don't know what they are made of. My bias is for the material in longer use, the metal lid with the built in plastisol "gasket". I don't know what the argument is against the disposable metls lids other than they are a single use item (I inspect and reuse them as long as there is no corrosion of the metal, and the sealing compound is intact, but that's not a recommended practice. I don't really like paying for the lids AND the price has increased exponentially, and there has been at least one artificially created shortage that I know of, because there are so few manufacturers of the product.

But, when it comes to "NEW" and "IMPROVED" I'm suspicious. When each new "food safe" plastic is introduced it is always proclaimed to be superior to everything in use at the time. Over and over again, in a little time that has not proven to be true. Also, the plastic reusable lids- and I hope I have not misunderstood your question are very expensive. They are manufactured less than 10 miles from my home, or distributed from here, so I contacted the seller to see what it would take to buy them at a lower price, skip the middle man etc by buying a large enough amount but that was not an option. Stinkers, I have to buy from the retail seller, or online.

So, for two reasons, I did not buy any. And my bias is to wait a long time before I expose my food to that particular plastic.

And that's what I can contribute to the discussion.
 
wayne nicol
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thanks for the response mate, sorry looking back i realize i was a bit vague in my post- and i seem to be hijacking this thread now- so i will start a topic on its own- but i was specifically referring to the plastic lining on the metal lids- i mean plastic is essentially petrochemical- they tout that things are BPA free etc etc- but what about all the other toxins in the compound that has not been brought to the fore yet!
 
Scott Perkins
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I consider myself an expert on this subject as I have been preparing ready to eat canned bean/rice/meat meals for over ten years.
First I would say for 95 percent of people that it is best to NOT put any salt in the beans canned food you cook. Unless you want to die young
of stroke or hi blood pressure. You can always by cheap canned beans in the store with lots of salt.
I wanted quick nutritious meals as a bachelor and I put one inch of dry brown rice in the bottom of the jar, then one inch of either red/Kidney or black
dried beans in the jar and then a chunk of come kind of raw meat like chicken breast, pork loin, vennison etc etc in to the jar. Then I add any
kind of seasoning for variety if I am for instance making 35 or 45 meal jars in an afternoon etc. black pepper, garlic, onion powder, cajun seasoning,
mustard hot sauce, even tomato sauces like spaghetti sauces etc. Then I fill the jar all the way up with water. When you cook the jar contents
the rice and beans will soak up all the water and leave one inch of head space at the top of the jar. I cook at 15 pounds for 30 minutes for pint jars
and 40 minutes for quart jars and allow for slow cool usually but it depends if I am in a hurry and if I have more batches to cook.

When you first do this do not underestimate how much fluid the dry rice and beans can soak up. If you put too many beans and rice into the jar
you will create a bean/rice brick inside the jar that you can barely get out with a chisel.

You MUST use brown rice as white rice will disintegrate when cooking.
 
Dottie Kinn
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I've canned both dried beans and dried peas.

Here's my method: SOAK BEANS OVERNIGHT in filtered or well water!! Rinse with clean cold water (these steps help reduce gas). Fill canning jars half full or slightly less of soaked beans then fill with boiling water leaving 1" headspace. Process 40 minutes for a quart or 30 minutes for a pint.

Beans come out great!!

First time doing this, I put in too many peas and not enough water and got a nice mess. Mush of peas. The jury is still out about canning peas--how does one keep them from turning to mush??

I use a 7 bean mix of everything organic that I can find. Things like lentils or split peas don't go in this mix because they're way too small and cooking time is too different.

General notes about pressure canning, I NEVER add salt--it doesn't matter what the recipe says--for your health's sake, skip it. Use herbs instead for flavor. If you want more salt flavor, add it to the food on the plate you're about to eat.


 
Thekla McDaniels
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Dottie Kinn wrote:I've canned both dried beans and dried peas.

Here's my method: SOAK BEANS OVERNIGHT in filtered or well water!! Rinse with clean cold water (these steps help reduce gas). Fill canning jars half full or slightly less of soaked beans then fill with boiling water leaving 1" headspace. Process 40 minutes for a quart or 30 minutes for a pint.

General notes about pressure canning, I NEVER add salt--it doesn't matter what the recipe says--for your health's sake, skip it. Use herbs instead for flavor. If you want more salt flavor, add it to the food on the plate you're about to eat.




Dottie, are you using a pressure canner on that 40 minutes for a quart and 30 for a pint? What is your elevation, and how much pressure are you using?

I totally agree with you on the salt. That teaspoon per quart that seems standard for just about everything savory is there for the flavor. I think that's what the USA palate is trained to. The texture is probably affected just a little bit, but only minimally in my opinion.

I seldom add salt to anything until it gets to my plate. I have heard that sea salt does not affect blood pressure or the cardio vascular system the way refined (pure Na Cl with iodine and anti caking agents). I don't really know if it is true, but I eat salt from an ancient sea, and have quit worrying about my blood pressure. (have a strong family history of heart disease, and did limit my salt for most of my life).
 
Scott Perkins
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Many of you will find out soon enough that a lot the recommendations of well intentioned people here do not work.
The REASON to not soak and not precook beans is to prevent them from over cooking when you use the recommended
cooking times, heats and pressures of the canning mfgrs etc.
Small lentils and peas simply cannot be pressure canned according to USDA guidelines. They are too fragile and what you
wind up with is "paste" Commercial canners like the soup
makers in the grocery stores have much shorter cooking and pressure times but meet safety considerations due to
other procedures which prevent harmful bacteria.
Red Beans and Black beans are two beans that do not cook overly rapidly and I use exclusively due to their superior
nutrition compared to all other beans. Their color is a result of the anti cancer ingredient found in grapes and wine etc.

Salt use is a personally destructive behavior. Salt = slow suicide.
There are dozens of other flavorings and spices and herbs and heats to spike your food with if you insist.

Add variety... experiment... Along with raw meat chunks added to my beans and rice canned "meals" I like to stick
a whole carrot down the middle of the jar and or sometimes a big chunk of potato etc. Even did a cucumber and
squash once.... oh and especially chunks of onions/garlics etc.
 
Dottie Kinn
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Thekla,

We're at 2500 feet and my pressure cooker seems to like 12 pounds pressure.

As a side note, I've discovered the joy of raw canning meat!! YIKES is it EASY!! We're a household of 2 so I use half-pint jars. I cut the raw meat (tenderloin from a local processing house ). Sometimes I just cut a round slab that perfectly fits the jar, sometimes chunks and press out the air pockets. Don't make it too tight, though. I cracked several jars doing that. Leave the 1" at top. NO WATER, SALT, OR OTHER LIQUID. Process 12 pounds for 70 minutes. 95 minutes for quarts. The meat makes it's own juice. We've been doing this 2 years and no problems. The meat is absolutely delicious, moist, and tender.
 
Dottie Kinn
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Hi Scott,

Thanks for the info about the soaking. I've read forever, it seems, that beans should always be soaked to remove the undigestable and toxic elements in the skin. Can't remember their names at this point. Will pressure cooking them w/out soaking eliminate these I'm for trying it but don't really want to poison us.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Both sodium and chloride are essential to life processes. It is probably very hard to be deficient in either one if eating mainstream USA processed foods from the corporate giants, but if one grows their own, or starts with raw, dry or otherwise entirely unadulterated ingredients, then, IMO, salt can be an important part of a mineral rich diet, especially if one uses a complete unadulterated or modified salt rich in trace minerals.

I have read a few reports of farmers using sea salt as a soil amendment or "fertilizer" and measuring increased yields and better flavor and more minerals in the harvest. I plan to do a small test here this year, adding a fraction of what the documented research added to their soil, as I have alkaline soil, with plenty of "mineral salts" already present, and it DOES seem counter intuitive to add salt to the soil.
 
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