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Unripe Fig Preserve  RSS feed

 
Lisa Paulson
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I had a fresh semi sweet fig a week ago and was lamenting the timing of my crop this year as I have tons of unripe figs.  Every year i have left the unripe ones , but this year i went looking for recipes .  I am pretty sure you would be able to make relish as well as the preserve recipe in the link.

http://www.giverecipe.com/unripe-fig-jam.html

Also figs ooze a latex, could this be useful in some application?
Hmm, found this:


Leaves: Fig leaves are used for fodder in India. They are plucked after the fruit harvest. Analyses show: moisture, 67.6%; protein, 4.3%; fat, 1.7%; crude fiber, 4.7%; ash, 5.3%; N-free extract, 16.4%; pentosans, 3.6%; carotene on a dry weight basis, 0.002%. Also present are bergaptene, stigmasterol, sitosterol, and tyrosine.

In southern France, there is some use of fig leaves as a source of perfume material called "fig-leaf absolute"—a dark-green to brownish-green, semi-solid mass or thick liquid of herbaceous-woody-mossy odor, employed in creating woodland scents.

Latex: The latex contains caoutchouc (2.4%), resin, albumin, cerin, sugar and malic acid, rennin, proteolytic enzymes, diastase, esterase, lipase, catalase, and peroxidase. It is collected at its peak of activity in early morning, dried and powdered for use in coagulating milk to make cheese and junket. From it can be isolated the protein-digesting enzyme ficin which is used for tenderizing meat, rendering fat, and clarifying beverages.

In tropical America, the latex is often used for washing dishes, pots and pans. It was an ingredient in some of the early commercial detergents for household use but was abandoned after many reports of irritated or inflamed hands in housewives.

Medicinal Uses: The latex is widely applied on warts, skin ulcers and sores, and taken as a purgative and vermifuge, but with considerable risk. In Latin America, figs are much employed as folk remedies. A decoction of the fruits is gargled to relieve sore throat; figs boiled in milk are repeatedly packed against swollen gums; the fruits are much used as poultices on tumors and other abnormal growths. The leaf decoction is taken as a remedy for diabetes and calcifications in the kidneys and liver. Fresh and dried figs have long been appreciated for their laxative action.



 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3386
Location: woodland, washington
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lots of unripe figs around here, too.  I think I'll try the jam.  somebody else's tree, though, so I don't think I'll be defoliating it to feed the goats...
 
Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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A friend from Mexico City once told me about a way to use unripe figs that I would love to figure out how to do... it basically sounded like a simple syrup over figs packed in a container for several weeks.  I gave it a shot and it never did anything more than sit there. 

Wonder if it is specific to certain types of figs.  the end result sounded similar to the commercially available dried black mission figs.  I was trying it with the Italian Honey variety.
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