• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Volunteer cucurbit in my humanure pile... eat it?  RSS feed

 
Bethany Dutch
Posts: 164
Location: Colville, WA Zone 5b
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know, this is kind of a noob question but I can't seem to find any information about what vegetables might take up pathogens systemically.

I keep each year's humanure pile separate, and last year's pile has a beautiful cucumber or SOMETHING growing in it. I don't manage my piles - my oldest pile is almost 4 years old and I still probably won't use it for another year or so, I tend to do the "let it sit long enough with lots of worms in it and it should be fine" kind of deal.

So I'm not entirely sure if I should leave it or pull it - what do you think? Are there vegetable plants that can potentially take up pathogens or would I really just need to worry about root or leafy crops that might physically touch the compost?
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9697
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't believe it could take up pathogens. I believe if it fruits the fruit should be safe to eat, especially if washed and peeled.  If you're really worried, cook it.

 
Ryan Sharon
Posts: 37
Location: San Francisco/Gualala, Ca (zone 8)
forest garden hugelkultur woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My understanding is similar to what Tyler expressed.

We had a similar experience but with volunteer tomatoes: they looked amazing, but just to be safe, we didn't eat the fruits. What we did do, however, is harvest the seeds from those tomatoes and the next year we had some ridiculously large bushes and munched on some of the tastiest tomatoes I've ever had!
 
chip sanft
Posts: 380
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
26
bike books dog
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tyler Ludens wrote:If you're really worried, cook it.


Yes to this. There are many people who use humanure that is less aged than yours to grow veggies (this is traditional and still used in China, for instance). The produce is then thoroughly cooked before eating, which kills any pathogens that splashed onto the veggies.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5727
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
324
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
harvest the seeds


that sounds like a great compromise... just let it grow and save the seed.
 
Jane Weeks
Posts: 37
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Very timely for me. I have a volunteer squash plant growing in one of my mixed humanure/compost bins. I've had tomatoes before & if I get more I'll definitey harvest the seeds – great idea!

I rotate three large bins, but don't use the finished compost on veg beds. I want to, but worry.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
287
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've had tomatoes before...

Those tomatoes are most likely from seeds that you ate...
...tough little seeds.

there was a treatment facility about a mile from where I once lived.  After the raw sewage went through the treatment plant, they piled the sludge outside.  Those sludge piles looked like tomato farms all summer long.

 
Jane Weeks
Posts: 37
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...there was a treatment facility about a mile from where I once lived.  After the raw sewage went through the treatment plant, they piled the sludge outside.  Those sludge piles looked like tomato farms all summer long.



I don't suppose anybody harvested them? ;)
 
Bethany Dutch
Posts: 164
Location: Colville, WA Zone 5b
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How interesting! Had no idea tomato seeds survive digestion.

I've been planning on using the humanure next year when I start putting in perennial fruits and fruit trees, but yeah now I'm sitting here wondering. I may just feed the fruits to the chickens and have them turn them into eggs and call it a day I just can't bear to pull it out, it's so lovely and flourishing. My volunteers always do better than my planted plants, that's for sure.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
287
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Had no idea tomato seeds survive digestion.

Many seeds survive digestion.
That's why birds are such great spreaders of plants.

 
chip sanft
Posts: 380
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
26
bike books dog
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Polk wrote:
Had no idea tomato seeds survive digestion.

Many seeds survive digestion.
That's why birds are such great spreaders of plants.



Yep -- we now get volunteers popping up where the birds s(h)it and the sun shines! YUM
 
What are you doing? You are supposed to be reading this tiny ad!
This is an example of the new permies.com Thread Boost feature
https://permies.com/wiki/61482/Thread-Boost-feature
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!