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Fermented pickle storage...?

 
Posts: 67
Location: West Central Georgia
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I have fermented pickles!  I did it in a big pot, though, because I didn't quite understand that's what I was doing or what the result would be.  I need them in a smaller cantanister now.  Any ideas?  We have a recently emptied glass pickle jar from the grocery store, and a quart mason jar hanging around--can I just boil those and use them?  Should I transfer the liquid with it, or should I whip up a new batch of liquid for the transfer?    Please forgive my ignorance, and I appreciate any helpful responses.  
 
Posts: 61
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
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I ferment the most wonderful dill pickles. When they're ready I put them up in wide-mouth mason jars. I've just ordered plastic screw-on lids (from amazon as nobody around me sells them) as the metal ones get rusted very quickly with fermented pickles.

edited to add: fill the jar with pickles first, then pour in the fermenting liquid & add a clove of garlic and sprig of dill flower, as well as a small grape leaf if you have such. The grape leaf helps to preserve crunchiness.
 
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I agree with Jane that grape leaves can enhance crunchiness. Oak leaves too. I'm sure they add other nutrition/microbiology as well.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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I reuse store bought jars for all sorts, so long as the lids are still in good shape.  Pickle jars, salsa jars, mayonnaise jars...  I even can with them.  We buy our olives in a liter jar which is great for fermenting stuff--right now I'm fermenting chard stems with garlic.
 
Emily Smith
Posts: 67
Location: West Central Georgia
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Awesome!  Thanks for the replies.  I will start keeping those miscellaneous store jars in the future, too, then!  And maybe plant some grapes.  
 
I found a beautiful pie. And a tiny ad:
Perennial Vegetables: How to Use Them to Save Time and Energy
https://permies.com/t/96921/Planting-Perennial-Vegetables-Homestead
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