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Saving my peaches..

 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Via the S.T.U.N.n method I have managed to get matey thirty large,reddening peachs on the beat up,end of season $7.00 tree I planted two years ago.
Cool,right? Unfortunately they are still hard to the touch,and have no scent.
And yet the animals seem to like them well enough!
So how to keep the rest?
I am considering grabbing some scraps of screen and twist ties, wrapping each and every one of them,but I am looking for an lazier way....
 
Chris Wells
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Many animals are effectively deterred by bird netting. It is cheap and easy to find. You can get enough low grade netting to cover the foliage of one tree for about $10. Quality product will cost about 2-3 times that, but will last more than a decade where the cheap stuff often lasts only a couple years.
 
wayne fajkus
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Someone in texas swears by boxing each peach. They take a thin clear plastic flip open box that some peaches  (or tomatoes, or sandwiches) are packaged in and closes it over a single peach on the tree. Once in a while they open it to remove ants that get stuck inside. The say the peaches are larger and less blemished compared to peaches they dont box.

It was on tv.  central texas gardener. Not sure if they access online
 
Bryant RedHawk
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What type of animals are you talking about eating unripe fruit
The type of animal will usually determine the best method to deter them.
Netting works well for birds but raccoons may simply go under it or chew a hole in it as an example.

A little more information will get you best fit answers.
 
Miranda Converse
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If it's squirrels you're having trouble with, I have heard that metal sheathing wrapped around the base of the tree will help prevent them from climbing up. I'm going to try this on my Pecan tree this year. The squirrels are terrible about testing each pecan for ripeness and throwing the green ones on the ground. The three years I've been at my place I've gotten maybe 20 pecans from a fairly mature tree :/
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Thanks for the replies.
I can't be sure, but I suspect squirrels.
Some of the peaches are eaten down to and halfway around the pit.
My tree is very bush like so even the least athletic squirrel need not go to the trunk,there are branches within a foot of the ground.
Would a net stop a squirrel?
 
John Saltveit
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ziplocs help a lot. cut off the bottom.
js
pdx or
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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William, if it is squirrels then an electric net will deter them quite well. My brother used to have trouble with squirrels in his nut trees, electric net with a 10 joule charger did the trick and in a few cases even gave him some meat for squirrel stew.

In the world of electric fence and net it is the joule count that matters, the higher joules give more intense shocks, for squirrels you would need around a 4 joule shock to deter them from ever trying again without the possibility of the shock killing them.

I have a charger that puts out 25 joules (this is enough energy to kill a dog, or energize 4 miles of wire for cattle deterent), I have never used this charger (it's made from the power unit of an old neon sign).
 
John Wolfram
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The best long term solution I've found is to simply overwhelm the tree rats by planting more fruit trees than they can bother in the window of time when the fruit is edible.
 
John Saltveit
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Terriers love to attack small vermin.  I bring my mini schnauzzer out  to hunt when I'm working in the yard. She loves it.
John S
PDX OR
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Thanks for all the replies.
While I dithered, the beasties ate even more peaches!
Pulled them all, now they are in bowl with a banana.

Next year I will then them and bag them individually.

Now it's  time to make some more trees via air layering.
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