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What to do with Bell Peppers and Tomato suggestions  RSS feed

 
garden master
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I have a lot of Bell Peppers and Tomatoes, what should I do with them?

Earlier this year I made stuffed peppers with the bell peppers but they were bitter so we just haven't wanted them to be fixed that way again.

I thought about drying them or freezing them but really would like to make them into something to preserve them for later use. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
gardener
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Location: Ohio, USA
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Canning or freezing: soup, pasta sauce, salsa, pickle them, ketchup,
Dry the tomatoes in slices and hot peppers.


 
gardener
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For me, green bell peppers are for fresh eating -- diced in salads mostly, cut into strips with a dipping sauce, sometimes stuffed and cooked.  I also like them as a flavor component in soups, stews, and tomato sauces, but for that, frozen or dried works just as well.  So if I were faced with a surplus, I'd start with freezing or drying for later cooking use.

However, if your growing conditions allow and you can leave green bell peppers on the plant, they will (depending on cultivar and weather and your garden nibbler pressure) usually ripen into sweet red peppers, which I much prefer and which I think are less likely to have bitterness issues.  You might enjoy making stuffed peppers with them then.

Hope this helps!
 
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If I had surplus sweet pepper and tomatoes, I'd made lecho. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lecs%C3%B3

Basically, you cut veggies in pieces, add salt/spices to taste, simmer until pepper is soft enough for you and pour into sterilised jars (or better pour into jars and cook in canner / pressure cooker).
In some cultures they add onion, sausage, rice, what else.

Made properly, it's an awesome fixing (dressing? side dish?), goes perfect with pasta and meat. Also fine cold with bread. But then again different cultures and tastes.
 
pollinator
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So far, I can only dream of a sweet pepper surplus.  If I did have one though, I think I'd tend towards dicing and freezing for winter use in fritattas and casseroles and stews and veggie enchiladas and that sort of thing.

With tomatoes, my usual policy is to sauce and can half, and dry half.  The dried ones are great chopped up on pizza and in eggs, and can also be made into a quick sauce if you run out of your canned sauce towards the end of the year by soaking in some hot water and then blending.
 
Anne Miller
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

Sergey Shepelev wrote:If I had surplus sweet pepper and tomatoes, I'd made lecho. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lecs%C3%B3

Basically, you cut veggies in pieces, add salt/spices to taste, simmer until pepper is soft enough for you and pour into sterilised jars (or better pour into jars and cook in canner / pressure cooker).
In some cultures they add onion, sausage, rice, what else.

Made properly, it's an awesome fixing (dressing? side dish?), goes perfect with pasta and meat. Also fine cold with bread. But then again different cultures and tastes.



This sounds really tasty so I think I'll try some that way to see how I like it.  I may make some pepper and onion relish and tomato chutney.  I've been putting some of the older tomatoes in to soup.
 
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Actually, you might want to consider not canning and go with fermentation. Canning  is hard on the nutrients. I have seen blogs where people basically ferment the tomatoes with the bacteria that naturally occurs on them, strain the liquid and the n they have a big ball of paste that is shelf stable. The liquid goes into airtight containers and is preserved too.

If anyone knows more about this method, please chime in. I'm wondering if you need to use salt to brine the tomatoes, or of you can just make it with only the tomato.
 
steward
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...I can only dream of a sweet pepper surplus


Sounds like me.  I can grow bushels of tomatoes and chili peppers, but alas, a bell pepper is beyond me.
(I probably need more good sun.)

Chile Verde is another dutch-oven favorite.

 
Anne Miller
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Amy, I ended up fermenting the bell pepper.  It was my first since I did salsa several years ago. I'll probable do more ferments as I want to learn to do that.

The plants are starting to make again as we have had rain and a bit cooler weather. 
 
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