Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

What to do with huge cucumbers?

 
gardener
Posts: 1508
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
350
hugelkultur dog forest garden fish hunting trees books food preservation solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I am away and can't tend the garden for four or five days, I always come home to find that my slicing cucumbers have gotten huge. I could save the seeds of a few since I'm sure the seeds are fully developed. I compost some that are starting to turn from green to yellow. What about the rest of them? Is there a way to use some of these in recipes?
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11387
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
746
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One of the most delicious things ever is chicken and cucumber stirfry.
 
Posts: 14
Location: Cincinnati, OH
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Could probably juice them as well.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
240
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Chutney http://www.allotment-garden.org/recipe/7/vals-recipe-cucumber-apple-chutney/
Raita http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/traditional-indian-raita-242185
 
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: USDA Zone 8a
707
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Usually the seeds are too big and tough so I peel them and cut out the seeds.  Then I chop them for kimchi, pickles or even a salad.  If you have been wanting to learn to ferment, now would be a good time.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
gardener
Posts: 1508
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
350
hugelkultur dog forest garden fish hunting trees books food preservation solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks! Those are all sounding delicious! I think the cucumbers at this size has a stronger, slightly bitter flavor so the recipe would have to be seasoned well to balance the bitterness.

What seasonings do you use in your chicken and cucumber stir fry, Tyler?

I do have a juicer. I use it mostly for tomato juice (V8-ish). I'd like to try juicing some cucumbers. I've loaned it out right now, but when I get it back I'll try some. Do I peel them first if they are large?

Fantastic sounds great! That allotment-garden.org also had a Cucumber and Pepper Relish recipe that sounded good too. Thanks.

Anne, I also have a Perfect Pickler (airlock/lid for a qt canning jar).I haven't used it much except for sauerkraut. Tried a yellow squash relish once that I wasn't too happy with the flavor. I need some better go-to recipes for it. I bet there are some here on the fermenting forum.

For cucumbers of "normal size" the recipe I love is for cucumber dip:
Peel and remove seeds from 3 med. cucumbers, cut into chunks and put in food processor with 1 med. onion, also peeled and cut into chunks. Pulse in processor until pea size pieces or slightly smaller. Drain in a collander, pressing to remove as much juice as you can. Add to 2 (8oz.) blocks of softened cream cheese. Salt and pepper to taste. Mix well. Chill. Serve with crackers or crusty bread.
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11387
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
746
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use a little garlic, soy sauce, and I think fresh ginger would also be good.
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11387
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
746
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've also used overly big cucumbers in curry - I put pretty much anything in curry.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
gardener
Posts: 1508
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
350
hugelkultur dog forest garden fish hunting trees books food preservation solar
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. I have garlic, soy sauce and fresh ginger. And I have plenty of cucumbers!
IMG_20160829_151506033.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20160829_151506033.jpg]
The bounty
 
steward
Posts: 4698
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
1567
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Karen Donnachaidh wrote:When I am away and can't tend the garden for four or five days, I always come home to find that my slicing cucumbers have gotten huge. I could save the seeds of a few since I'm sure the seeds are fully developed. I compost some that are starting to turn from green to yellow. What about the rest of them? Is there a way to use some of these in recipes?



My local restaurant practically begs for the big cucumbers that are starting to turn yellow. The chef claims that they are sweeter, and less bitter. I accommodate him, because I love feeding my community. He makes really tasty pickles out of them. That makes it really nice for me, then I only have to pick the cucumber patch once a week.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
gardener
Posts: 1508
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
350
hugelkultur dog forest garden fish hunting trees books food preservation solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Joseph. Good to know. I've got salsa in the canner right now and I think tomorrow I'm doing pickles.
 
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This year on my lot, I had a lot of huge cucumbers. They love the shad and plenty of room to grow, so the way I usually do it is I plant cucumber seeds very closely, so that the leaves can have a dense foliage. Once flowering begins and you can see baby cucumbers, wait a week or a bit more and you'll get huge cucumbers. If you wait too long, they will turn yellow.

Once they turn yellow, I usually use it for seeds for next year. But the green larger ones are great for salads and such. It looks even better on a burger, having one slice of such a large cucumber, almost as large as a tomato, which makes a great conversation piece.

cucumber.jpeg
[Thumbnail for cucumber.jpeg]
Large Cucumber
 
Karen Donnachaidh
gardener
Posts: 1508
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
350
hugelkultur dog forest garden fish hunting trees books food preservation solar
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mariusz Olyruk wrote:But the green larger ones are great for salads and such. It looks even better on a burger, having one slice of such a large cucumber, almost as large as a tomato, which makes a great conversation piece.



Mariusz,
Your cucumbers look as big and beautiful as mine! Tomorrow I'm going to try a recipe I use for squash pickles and start one that I use for watermelon rind pickles. I'll let you know how it turns out.
 
gardener
Posts: 1465
Location: Los Angeles, CA
341
hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The big cucumbers don't even make it out of the garden.  I split them open and throw them into the chicken tractor.  The girls go absolutely crazy for cucumber, as the seeds are smaller and they really like to peck away at the goo in the middle.

In fact, I intentionally let a few get massive just so I've got a treat for them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 302
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
70
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Or you can share the bounty with your chickens. They will make more compost for you.
I have made pickles with it too, assuming the seeds are not too big.. peel and make sticks [like 1/2" X 1/2"X whatever length]. Then you can either eat fresh with your favorite dressing or make pickles.
Save the seeds and cut length wise, hollow it out with a spoon to make a little "boat". Put other goodies in the boat: fresh peas, egg salad: Each overgrown cuke will make 2 individual servings. Kids like the novelty and may actually eat their veggies! peanut butter, nuts, anything they like will go well in these little boats.
 
Cécile Stelzer Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 302
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
70
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Giffin wrote:Could probably juice them as well.



Yes, the light green juice is very refreshing served ice cold by itself or mixed with some other juice.
 
pollinator
Posts: 548
Location: Denmark 57N
122
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They're not the right type of cucumber  but you could still make a danish pickle, Asier. (Asie are huge outdoor cucumbers with smooth skins weighing in at 2-3 lb for a decent sized one) cut them in half length ways scoop out the seeds, and peel them. then salt overnight, cut into slices about 1/2 cm thick and pickle to whatever recipe you like


Really funny this photo, I looked for an image and found this one on the second page, that's made by my mother in law!
 
pollinator
Posts: 376
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
120
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cucumber soup is delish and so quick to make, take skin of or leave on if you like bitter, make in cubes blend it, add sour cream and pepper and dille, voila!
 
pollinator
Posts: 1334
Location: RRV of da Nort
162
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Another recipe similar to the Danish one above:  https://permies.com/t/59493/kitchen/Senfgurken

Also, a Nepalese coworker who saw the thread mentioned these:  https://www.archanaskitchen.com/instant-cucumber-pickle-recipe
 
pollinator
Posts: 159
Location: South Central PA
35
cat fungi urban
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I still love my grandma's creamy cucumber salad, sadly she passed away and no one has the "real" recipe. But she mostly cooked to taste and probably didn't follow her own recipe. Here's one that is very similar: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/sour-cream-cucumbers/
 
gardener
Posts: 1279
Location: Okanogan Highlands, Washington
285
hugelkultur cat dog books food preservation
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for all the great recipes.

It doesn't use up a lot of cucumber, but I love sliced cucumber in summer drinks.
Try it with lime, or mint, or both.
Cucumber juice or pulp works too, if you have a juicer handy.  

I find cucumber and melon drinks super good for hydration during hot outdoor work. Sometimes we add a hint of sea salt for electrolytes.

Sliced cucumber or melon, along with other sliced fruits, are good with the Mexican salt and chili mix sprinkled on for a quick summer snack.

Big ones can have seeds scooped out and sliced longwise, sized like carrot sticks and celery. Great snacks for road trips, or for dipping.


 
it's a teeny, tiny, wafer thin ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!