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Why burros,donkeys,or mules?

 
Ben Mosley
Posts: 49
Location: Upstate,SC Zone 7a
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Something odd is happening around me.Cattle and horse farms are adding burrows,donkeys,or mules in with their cows and horses.Why?One older man I talked with said, the donkeys, and such,were more skittish.They would alert to predators before the cows or horses would know they were there.Is this true?There has been a big market for small burrows and donkeys here lately.That may make it feasible to buy acreage,other than to just have a boundary between neighbors.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Burrows, Donkeys and Mules do indeed function as guard animals.
Not only will they raise a ruckus when predators such as coyotes come a calling but they will dispatch said predators with a well placed hoof kick.
They get along well with just about any animal you need protected, including horses, cattle, goats, pigs and sheep.
They eat about the same amount per day as a horse.

The use of these animals as guard animals has an extremely long history (as in BC, not AD).

We have a donkey that we are trying to invite to come live with us right now.
The owner has abandoned the animal and turned her out to fend for herself.
Since I will not allow any domesticated animal to not have a safe home, I am going to invite this donkey to come live on Buzzard's Roost Farm.
We have to buy hay and straw anyway and I like donkeys as much as I like horses so it is going to be good if she decides to come to live with us.
I even have a grand spot for her house and she will have plenty to eat and others for friendship.
 
Ben Mosley
Posts: 49
Location: Upstate,SC Zone 7a
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Thanks for confirming what I was told.I prefer the smaller donkeys.I hope you get that one.It sounds like it needs a good home.
 
Su Ba
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Prior to getting my donkey (a Hawaiian Nightengale), I would lose sheep to stray dogs. I've lost over a dozen so far. Since the donkey was integrated into the flock, I haven't lost any more stock even though I've found evidence of dogs digging under the fencing. But I have found one dead dog carcass. And neighbors have reported seeing the donkey trying to rundown a dog in the pasture, cornering it, and throwing it over the fence (most likely totally accidental) by grabbing it up in the teeth and shaking it. The donkey was probably trying to kill the dog, who was lucky to escape when slung.

 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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That's it! I am getting me a burro!
Seriously though,I love such a self reliant animal that still partner with us. Also, donkey milk cheese may be the rarest of all....😆

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160720-a-cheese-made-from-donkey-milk
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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