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Eating a goat

 
Heather Ward
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Recently I was gifted a Nubian buck kid, 5 months old, to breed my doe. He is very loud and the giver doesn't want him back😉. I was thinking of keeping him with the doe until December and then having him butchered at about 7 months. He doesn't have much bucky scent. Is the meat likely to be good? One local person has told me that no unneutered buck over 3-4 months old is edible.
 
Alder Burns
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Depends on your tolerance for strong gamey meat and also how you prepare it.  Personally I would curry it.  I would can the meat with curry spices right in the jars.  Preferably after hanging the animal or putting it somewhere cold, if the weather isn't cold enough, after skinning and gutting, to let it age for a few days....
 
R Ranson
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It would probably taste better if you butcher in the spring when his hormones are less excited.

Nothing wrong with male goat meat, especially if they meet a calm ending so the stress doesn't flavour the meat.  I choose a home death using a halal butcher so I know the animal is calm and relaxed, especially for adult or male animals.  This makes the meat more tender and mild.
 
David Livingston
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lots of good recipes from the Caribbean and the magreb for goat
 
Heather Ward
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I never thought of being able to have a butcher come to my place. I'll look into that. I have access to some very good pork belly, and thought of grinding some of the meat half and half with pork belly to make sausage. Does that have possibilities?
I've also come across a Mexican recipe for grilled goat marinated in garlic, cumin, and oil, and that might be worth trying.
 
R Ranson
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Mmmm, pork and goat sausage!  Fantastic!

Goat sausage is also amazing.  Then again, even an adult goat can taste good on its own.  If the animal meets a calm end, it tastes a bit like mild beef with a hint of lamb. 

I butcher at home because the first animal we raised and sent to the abattoir, was about 100 pounds live weight.  We got 42 pounds of meat!  Up to 60% of the animal can go in the garbage at a facility, depending on all sorts of factors.  I find that disrespectful to the animal.  I decided to learn to butcher at home.  Here, the local laws say I can harvest my own animal, on my own land, for my own consumption.  It's good to check what your local laws are as this isn't always the case.  I hire someone to do the ending.  It makes me sad, but I watch because it is a life I've been responsible for and I want to be certain the ending is calm.  A home butchery gives me about 90 to 95% edible product and the rest is useful (bones, horn, hide) so that the only thing that goes to waste is some of the blood that spills during the first cut.  And the lungs.  I hate tripe!  That goes to the chickens

The first goat we did at home was an angry old thing.  She was about 10 years old and attacked a child.  I cull for personality and any animal of mine that attacks a human (that isn't me) doesn't get to see another sunrise.  You wouldn't believe how angry this goat was.  Think of the grumpiest goat you can imagine, and triple it.  Angry, smelly, nasty goat.  We thought no way is this meat going to be edible.  But she broke the rule so we got our friend around to slaughter her halal style.  This involves calming the goat.  He lay the goat down on the ground and stroked her until she was completely relaxed.  This can take anywhere from a minute to an hour.  For Madam Angry Goat, it took about 20 minutes.  When she was completely relaxed, she was ended with a quick slash of the knife.  A very fast death.  The meat was tender, had none of that rare meat smell you get in the grocery shop, it tasted like lamb with a hint of beef.  We expected to make sausage with her.  No need.  The meet was lovely as is. 

In the Charcuterie by Boetticher and Miller has been my favourite book - not just for cutting up the meat but also for recipes.  Their recipes are more like guidelines.  This is what you do to keep it safe, these are some ideas on how to make salami, now go forth and experiment. 


 
David Hernick
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Goat birria is a Mexican preparation for a whole goat that is popular for celebrations.  I had a guy butcher a goat for me once on site and prep it for birria.  It was pretty amazing to watch, just a couple parts are not used, you can guess which ones. The guys method was very similar to the halal style described.  A sort of sausage is made with the organs and everything receives a chili spice blend.  The goat once prepared is slow cooked in a tamale steamer topped with nopales/prickly pear pads if I remember correctly.
 
Andy Moffatt
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When you send an animal to the slaughter house they remove the hide, head, feet and entrails which for sheep and goats is usually 55-60% of the liveweight so 42pounds from a 100 pound animal is about right. We usually worked on 42% yield on the farm I used to work on when sending lambs away
 
R Ranson
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Andy Moffatt wrote:When you send an animal to the slaughter house they remove the hide, head, feet and entrails which for sheep and goats is usually 55-60% of the liveweight so 42pounds from a 100 pound animal is about right. We usually worked on 42% yield on the farm I used to work on when sending lambs away


Yes, it is pretty standard.

I think there are a lot of useful parts on an animal that we don't use anymore.  We can make headcheese from goat and sheep - it's quite nice actually.  Sometimes the facility tosses the neck which makes the best sausage.  The hide can be tanned or used as rawhide.  Fat for soap, hand cream, a lotion for oiling wooden tools, or even as grease for some mechanical tools.  Hooves make rattles or gelatin.  Bones and horns are very useful.  guts for sausage casings, stomach and pluck for haggis (goat haggis is very nice, it's like an oatmeal sausage).  I can understand why these are tossed in an abattoir as they aren't very popular with the modern pallet. 

However, I don't find that kind of waste acceptable for my own animals.  It's like cooking a meal, then tossing over half of it in the trash.  I'm very soft-hearted about my livestock and I don't feel it honours their giving their life for my subsistence if I don't make the most of it.  Also, I'm frugal and hate the idea of tossing useful things away.
 
Andy Moffatt
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Same, ask people in the street what giblets are...
It's all in our head I have recipes for calf and lambs head and brains I just haven't gone there yet, other offal is good as.
I hunt/shoot feral goats I try pick younger nannies but we've eaten some stinkies the really stinky stuff like old billies and big wild boars gets turned into tasty pickles and salamis.
You could find someone who knows how to cut him, we do it to lambs and bulls. A sharp knife is all you need and you'll have a wether.
 
Randy Wier
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My family an I have eaten many intact billys under a year old.  We have not noticed any weird gamey flavors.

In general, I think people are overly afraid of gameyNess in animals.
 
Matthew McDonnell
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IF ya want your moneys worth here is my opinion, Its what ya paid for it.

I hear all the time from people that know little how this animal or that animal is "gamey" or isn't good unless this or that. HAWGWARSH! Yes, I spelled it that way on purpose. Roast that boy over an open fire and invite some friendly Greeks over, brother you will have the best time ever! Put a stick in one end and out the other and turn over hot coals for about half a day or less and when you cut into that goat it will be the best you ever tasted. Shoot, much of it also makes great hamburger meat. Grind it up and add some seasoning. MMMMMM. Im hungry just thinking about it.


On second thought, that goat will taste horrid! I wouldn't waste the time skinning him! I pay shipping and you send him down here. Ill put it to work pulling a sled or something for Santa. Yeah, you send him here. Scratch all that stupid talk I just wrote out.
 
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