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am I safe to ferment food left out growing mold if I boil with turmeric?  RSS feed

 
peter kimber
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Rice/beans/carrots/brocoli lunch left out in bag three days is growing mold ? Can this be boiled wuth Ginger lemon lime Turmeric sea salt black pepper and all the skins and rimes of fruit like garlic/ onion skins banana an orange peels for example and be served as safe fermented food. Basically asking is it safe to keep eating it in pot if you leave left overs in pot to mold again. I was told boiling food kills germs I already know power lemon has kill bacteria too and termeric kills all stomach viruses. Im basically doing this to not keep throwing out food I would consider bad. Wondering though is this a unsafe extreme of fermentation harmful to body or am I still within the ball parks of getting all good pro biotics of healthy gut and fermentation benefits as such?
 
John Saltveit
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General rule that I have heard with mold: If it is something soft, throw the whole thing out, like a casserole.  If it is something hard, like a raw carrot or a block of cheese, and the mold won't grow all the way through it, chop off the moldy part and eat the rest if it's safe.

The problem is not solvable through boiling or adding turmeric. The microbiology that contaminated it creates its own waste products that can't be removed and make you sick, not stronger.
John S
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Rose Pinder
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I agree with John. If you kill all the pathogenic bacteria and mould you are still left with the toxins from that.

I don't think leaving food out in a bag for 3 days until mouldy counts as fermented. With ferments you want to create the conditions whereby the beneficial (to human gut) bacteria and yeasts are given priority over the pathogenic ones. There's a grey area between that and food just going rotten. I'll eat some foods when they are turning, but I draw the line at mould unless it is only on the surface and can be scraped off easily* eg jam. Usually I go by taste and smell and whether my body finds the food appealing.

*not for freshly cooked foods unless it is a small mount. IME, something like rice is past eating by the time mould forms.
 
John Saltveit
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Rose Pinder wrote:I agree with John. If you kill all the pathogenic bacteria and mould you are still left with the toxins from that.

I don't think leaving food out in a bag for 3 days until mouldy counts as fermented. With ferments you want to create the conditions whereby the beneficial (to human gut) bacteria and yeasts are given priority over the pathogenic ones. There's a grey area between that and food just going rotten. I'll eat some foods when they are turning, but I draw the line at mould unless it is only on the surface and can be scraped off easily* eg jam. Usually I go by taste and smell and whether my body finds the food appealing.

*not for freshly cooked foods unless it is a small mount. IME, something like rice is past eating by the time mould forms.

Right on, Rose.  Whether putting vegies under water with a plate and a rock, putting in starter, adding salt,   and then checking to make sure it is ok, it is intentional. Not just rotten. 

I don't eat random objects. I eat carefully cultured and selected foods, at their peak of flavor and nutrition.  There is a huge difference.
John S
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Eric Thompson
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Mold can produce toxins that can't be killed with anti-microbials or even heat.  Generally food with unknown molds should be thrown out.

I've come across the logic of "not wasting" some moldy food which I refute with "How much would you pay for this in the store?"  Generally the answer is that someone would not buy it even if it is free, so my locig says that if it has value 'less than zero' it should be thrown out...  That often makes sense to people.
 
Anne Miller
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The cost of a medical bill might be a way to look at not wasting food.

The "Rice/beans/carrots/brocoli lunch left out in bag three days is growing mold ?" is a day older now.

Besides the medical bill then there is the agony of having stomach cramps before you can get to the doctor.
 
Henry Jabel
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Cooked rice can be deadly if left around for too long. This is the stuff that grows on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_cereus

The toxins it produces are far from pleasant and are not destroyed from cooking so I doubt anything else will do it.
 
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