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Off Grid LP Stove  RSS feed

 
Alicia Winkler
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Location: Indiana
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Anyone have an off grid LP cook stove they highly recommend?
 
Su Ba
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The only gas range that did not need an electric hookup that I could find when I needed one was a Premier. Switching it from natural gas to LP was real simple. We just followed the directions in the owners manual. The stove uses D batteries to power the sparker for lighting the oven and burners. No electric hookup of any kind is needed to run the oven.

I can't say the the stove is top quality, but it's ok. The metal is a bit on the thin side. The enamel a bit too thin. Things work, but for the price I would think they should be better quality. But I'm no kitchen queen, so as long as equipment is functional in the kitchen, I'm satisfied. I've seen other premier ranges that were better built, so I don't know why the non-electric gas one is so reminiscent of something that came from China.

As I said, I didn't have the opportunity to check out other brands. Hubby wanted the range now, not later. And Premier was the only one I could get immediately. And having a range that didn't require electricity was a requirement.
 
Alicia Winkler
Posts: 51
Location: Indiana
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Thanks Su. My husband is insisting I have a stove at the farm. We have no access to electricity. I am planning to move out there for long term camping in April. just me and the kids. I was just going to use the fire, and maybe a solar over and camp stove, but he says some days I "will be too tired to not just cook and be done." lol. It's sweet that he is worried, I suppose.

What I thought was going to be an inexpensive experiment is blowing up in my face!
 
Anne Miller
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Any gas or propane stove that does not have electronic ignition would work, I believe.  The burners use a pilot light and so does the oven.
This is the way older stove were when I was growing up.  A gas stove can be converted to propane.  You would need a source for propane, which could be as simple as a bottle like outdoor grill use and run into the building with metal gas pipe.

Here is a link to battery operated stoves.

https://bensdiscountsupply.com/ranges-stoves/gas-ranges/off-the-grid-propane-or-natural-gas-ranges/

The off grid wofati at wheaton lab has a stove.  In fact there were several that have been used.  One was a cast iron that I have not fond the picture for yet.

The picture of the white apartment stove with the propane bottle is on the second page at the bottom.  [I must warn you, if you have children  reading this with you there is a "nude" photo.]


https://permies.com/t/40/33160/wofati-cooper-cabin

 
Anne Miller
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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Here are a couple of camp stove that also might work:

Camp-Chef-Pro-90

Camp-Chef-Outdoor-Camp-Oven
 
Alicia Winkler
Posts: 51
Location: Indiana
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Thanks Anne. I was thinking Camp Stove, too. Matt says lets go ahead and buy an LP range, since we need it anyway.
 
Miles Flansburg
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Alicia, if this will just be used as a backup to how you already cook or for ease of use, what I have done is go to craigslist or garage sales and picked up a couple of working backyard barbecue grills with the side burners, and a coleman grill with a stand. Get a few propane bottles and away you go. Together they cover almost anything you might want to do and if you find a grill with a rotisserie that is a bonus !

If you want something for inside the house, watch for someone who is parting out an old camper or giving one away that would have a propane stove and oven in it. Just be sure to ventilate any fumes.
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Wood-Cook-Stove, who needs propane?   

 
Alicia Winkler
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Location: Indiana
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We thought about that, too, but more for cooler times. Thanks, though I suppose if you retired your account you won't see this.
 
Travis Johnson
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Wood cook stoves have this natural nostalgic appeal, but reality is often harsh. Its kind of like those old cast iron claw foot tubs every designer magazine has, they are in there, but why? They are too high to step into to make a nice shower, and too stubby to make for a nice tub. I got one, and it works great...to water my sheep with!

So it is with a wood cook stove. On a day when it is twenty below and blowing twenty...its not bad, but when its 95 degrees out for a week, it is then that you wish you had something else. And that is not to mention trying to regulate an even temperature to get that apple pie to bake properly.

We have a standard propane stove, and while counter intuitive, it needs power to operate the oven. In a power outage we still have use of the stove top burners so that is good enough. If you are only looking at emergency use, then I would just get any old propane cook stove and just utilize the burners and not even worry about the oven aspect of it. Not to say that the other ideas are not good either. We use our propane barbeque all year...and I live in Maine!

DSCN1919.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSCN1919.JPG]
 
Robert Bizzarro
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I've lived with both and find like everything practice makes perfect. We have a cook stove that burns wood/coal and gas.  They used to make them about the turn of the last century so you will have to look for an antique.  I know Bee Bryant's Stove works in (Unity), Maine (?)   Still carries a variety.   Granted living in Alaska I never see 95°, but still..... I'd never live in a house without a cook stove.

YOU can't run out into the woods and cut down a Propane tree to cook your dinner.
 
Walt Chase
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Location: ALASKA
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If you are looking for one in the typical "box store" it is getting harder and harder to find one with standing pilot lights for burner ignition.  Most companies are moving, or have moved, to the high end  see it in a magazine electronic stoves.  Look for a hotpoint.  That is what we have in our kitchen and it works without any electricity at all.  No batteries, no 120v etc.  Just a plain jane standing pilot light stove.
 
Alicia Winkler
Posts: 51
Location: Indiana
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Well, I had one of those claw foot tubs....oh I wish I had it now!!! I love a good hot soak and that tub was big enough!!

I think a wood stove would be great as additional heat source for our cabin in cold months, as well as cooking. I just don't know if I can justify the space all year that it will take.

I am thinking an off-grid capable LP stove. This will not be emergency use only. I cook everything from scratch. I will be spending 100 days at the cabin April- July, to complete a challenge I set for myself. I will also have my 3 children, so I need proper facilities to care for them.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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