• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

best homemade or inexpensive small composter

 
Deborah Tupin
Posts: 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hi all. we have a 31 acre farm in northern virginia where i have been composting in huge piles. these piles include all kinds of grasses, spoiled hay, various animal manures, food and veg scraps, and cut up paper and cardboard. i leave these piles for a year or more, only turning them a few times a year with the tractor. this makes great compost and i am happy with it.
now i would like to have a small compost tumbler or bin in my garden, something that will take small bits of kitchen, garden, yard, and animal waste. i would like it to compost quickly, be easy to use, easy to empty, and easy to clean.
we could build it ourselves or purchase it. on our farm it is sometimes easier to purchase something than to wait until someone has the time to build what is needed. i was thinking something no bigger than a 55 gallon drum.
my garden is all no til and i have already built up the soil over the years. this is the compost i would add during the garden season rather than bringing large amounts to the garden with the tractor (which is what i do at the beginning and end of garden season).
photos, plans, or suggested styles and brands would be appreciated. i do not have time or energy for a bin system where i need to move or turn the compost on a regular basis. ty
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3861
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
152
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Deborah, welcome to permies!

I am wondering if we can make it even easier for you?  How about just composting in the garden itself? No bins, no moving from place to place. Is that something that might be doable?
 
Kris Mendoza
Posts: 78
Location: New England USA, Zone 7a
1
bee hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you must have a bin, check with your municipality or county before you buy or build anything--I just learned that my city's public works dept. will give residents a small, raccoon-proof bin for free if you go down to their office and pick it up! Who knew?!
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9609
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
174
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In-garden worm tower:  https://vimeo.com/153717114

I'm thinking of making some of these.
 
Deborah Tupin
Posts: 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
kris mendoza, i will give call the county about a bin. ty.
miles flansburg, ty, i should have said i wanted something mouse, rat, and snake proof. a couple of years ago i had a small pile composting in the garden. when digging it up in spring my daughter found a snake and several snake eggs at the bottom. i am so freaked out by snakes (good or bad) that i do not leave piles of anything in the garden. my daughter and i did build a big hugelkultur bed in late fall and i am very nervous every time i am near it. plus, i was thinking that something contained would compost quicker. if this is not true then i will keep taking stuff to the big piles and bringing small amounts of compost back when i need it.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3861
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
152
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There ya go, Tyler shows a great idea.

I was going to suggest a worm farm made out of a 55 gallon drum but I think the in garden bin that Tyler linked to would be really nifty.
 
The human mind is a dangerous plaything. This tiny ad is pretty safe:
2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!