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Pigfarm Perm Puzzle - WM - River Danger!

 
Brett M. Scott
Posts: 4
bee fungi trees
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PERMACULTURE PUZZLE FOR ALL OF US CHAPS AND CHAPETTES WHO LOVE THIS STUFF!

Critical details: Arkansas is the setting.
CAFO (they went operational sneakily and behind the publics back through dptm environmental quality corrupt bs )
- Astonishingly close to headwaters of a major and albeit undammed river (yes, we've already found algae overblooms down stream )
- Yes, its making headlines and its a political affair. Yes, we need help. Help?
ALSO: PIG AFFLUENT. They are doing the standard leach field system. Overusing it. They've also got ponds we hope to god don't run off downstream.
Why? Another conversation.

So how can we pitch a close loop on a massive near commercial scale? Cause they're scaling up in the months/years to come.

I'm asking for brainstorm ideas and feed back and critiques because I need more heads to solve my deadends. I'm dreaming big here without much expertise.

There's several approaches and possibilities. Practical and easy and low maintenance is most ideal. Similar to nature and pc 101.
Biogas, Mushroom farming, vermiculture, and others?

A big part that lead me here is mycology and mycoremediation. We'll need it to transmute the antibiotics and other silly additives like dewormer. We'll also need to predigest it in preparation for the mushrooms, yeah? It'll be way too hot and quite possibly anaerobic for the fungi kingdom right off the get go. And how long will/should it sit before involving it in other forms of life? Its not going to attract or sustain a nice wide range of microbes? So then there's the issue of avoiding rain runoff on big piles that sit for weeks. Bunker spawn of oyster mushrooms is a possibility with great efficacy (biofiltering rain runoff) but this is intensive labor. Perhaps let it lie and at one point add a good compost to introduce good bacteria? Should we let it lie in a thin 4-8 inch layer so that weight and compaction does not create a massive anaerbic zone? How much methane and other gasses will it even produce? I mean, we are talking a large volume and I have very minimal experience with biodigesters. And then there is BSFL.

SO, let it sit and lasagna with farmers donating really old hay bales. Thus, LOTS LOTS of carbon layers. ---> inject good compost tea slurry --> BSFL --> mushrooms --> reg wigglers --> soil sampling and selling ,perhaps fixing pH with natural organic additives. Overall time, 1.5 year rotations with a 2-4 ton batch size.

Add in bio digestor if feasible?
My goal here is an expanded and more environmentally sane business model for these farmers that is much more closed loop and doesn't massively destroy watershed.

Your thoughts, critiques, zany ideas, stats, facts, experience and stories are all very Very welcome.

Thanks so much.
Biscuit


 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Maybe biogas digesting could be a first step? It reduces the volume and generates methane for energy, but it doesn't reduce the nitrogen much so might not be helpful to your problems.
 
duane hennon
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hi Brett,

welcome to permies

AHHHHH, pigfarms

I think a little more info is needed

pig CAFOs, as I understand them consists of penned pigs in a building
the pens are elevated so the waste falls through the pens onto the floor
where it is washed away into the ponds

in permaculture there are thing we call Type 1 errors - mistakes in design the continue to haunt you

with CAFO we have a number
1. penned pigs with little room to move
2. pigs raised in buildings
3. adding water to excrement
4. collecting waste in open ponds

rotational grazing can be thought of as a "modified mobile CAFO"
it keeps the pigs together but allows to to move
it eliminates or reduces the the need for buildings
it eliminate the problem of wastes by allowing the animals to spread the wastes continually directly to the land

but since the CAFO is there
one of the most beneficial things to do is to remove as much solids as possible from the liquid before it gets to the ponds
(they probably can't change the removal system from the building)
some sort of screening system might be used (the wastes passes over a screen, solids are retain while the liquid flows to the pond
the collected solids fall into a pumping station where it is pumped to a tanker truck for haul away
this would reduce the loading on the ponds

you would want to propose a closed loop idea in steps
nobody will go "whole hog" for a unknown closed loop system unless you're buying and have a guarantee
(this is how they're making their living)
this  screening would be the 1st stage and its effectiveness evaluated before deciding the next idea
don't be confrontational, approach it constructively

just my ramblings
(25+ years dealing with industrial wastewater clients)


 
Brett M. Scott
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Aha! Truth rings in my knees with some of this. Words well spoken. Thanks.

Very good points and that is probably one of the most practical ideas of opening that door. I like it. Grounded : P
>>
So if said scenario with trunk hauling away solids, what would one do with both the water pond and the separated solids?
(The preface of this question here is that one person is in full control and has full say to design a system.)

make large gradient and ultimately series of biofiltering?> (water)

for solids, biodigest then turn to composting?

Hmm
 
duane hennon
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again one must remember that the CAFO doesn't has to do anything
they are approved and permitted

so the approach should be "How can we help you?"

the ponds will eventually treat the waste and make it safe for land spreading
removing as much solids as possible will improve the functioning of the ponds

So if said scenario with trunk hauling away solids, what would one do with both the water pond and the separated solids?
(The preface of this question here is that one person is in full control and has full say to design a system.)

make large gradient and ultimately series of biofiltering?> (water)

for solids, biodigest then turn to composting? 


maybe your group could propose a joint venture
where you would have a composting facility (perhaps at another less sensitive site)
(which, of course, will also have to be approved and permitted)
that would take the solids to compost with sawdust, wood chips, waste newspaper and cardboard, leaves, etc  for sale
(or donating to local city gardens, tree nurseries, etc)
the CAFO benefits with better functioning  ponds, reduce solids handling and some good PR
the environment benefits from less stress from the CAFO
 
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