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New to Milk Kefir Question

 
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Hi,
I have some new milk kefir grains that I ordered through the mail. They were bright white when new. I have been feeding them whole organic milk on a daily basis to strengthen them. (I want to use them to make coconut milk kefir when they're fully revived.) I have been producing a steadily growing supply of cottage cheese material. I'd like to dispose of the cottage cheese while retaining the grains. How do I tell the grains from the cheese? Are they harder or softer than the cheese-like stuff? Will I damage them if I touch them with my hands?
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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the grains propagate. That is just more grains. I use them as ricotta, yum! I would be careful pressing them too much because you will damage the structure with harsh treatment but they are not very delicate. As you do it for longer they will all be more gelatinous if you are processing it fast and will be more firm if they are left in a low-sugar/high-acid environment for a few days. That's how you get them ready to travel!

If you are transitioning to a different food source for the microbes, you will have to do it slowly. The stuff that eats lactose is not always the same stuff that eats other sugars. I think the microbes form a semisolid "grain", but the lactose consumers may have special talent for doing it, and you may be better off getting some grains specific for your feed source. I haven't ever used anything but milk. It can be done though!

 
N Thomas
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Thanks Jefferson!
 
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