Win a bunch of tools from Truly Garden and Loma Creek! this week in the Gear forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Steve Thorn
  • Eric Hanson

Ash content in spalted wood, bark?

 
gardener
Posts: 1280
Location: Okanogan Highlands, Washington
288
hugelkultur cat dog books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We're getting higher ash buildup in our stove lately.  There are at least 6 plausible explanations, more likely than this one, but it got me wondering...

Has anyone noticed a difference in ash buildup if burning spalted (fungal-stained) wood?  
Or bark?

We're into a section of the woodpile with an old spalted pine tree in it.  While we normally burn pine and bark, along with other fuels like larch and fir, it seems like we're getting more ash with this one pine tree and its knobbly limb-sections.

Just curious.

-Erica
 
master pollinator
Posts: 4601
1059
transportation cat duck trees rabbit books chicken woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is possible, the spalting (as you most likely know) stems from mineral streaks in the wood, so what you have is some decomposition by fungi and loss of wood, but still have the minerals deposited throughout the wood that remains.

The knotty sections may be due to resins in the woods. "Knots" in boards typically weep sap, and for years later too. So that could account for the extra ash possibly. Another thought is that the wood is denser in a knot.

As a woodworker though, it almost seems sad you are burning spalted wood. What great projects can be made from them, assuming they are not past prime. But I understand the need to stay warm too.

As a side note, did you hear why the piece of spalted pine firewood was dating the hot, bombshell blonde? Well its obvious, he was a Fungi (fun guy)!!
 
Live a little! The night is young! And we have umbrellas in our drinks! This umbrella has a tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!