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New LGD Breed - Grand Shepherd  RSS feed

 
Dan Ohmann
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Location: Inland Northwest
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I recently heard of a newish livestock guardian dog breed, the Grand Shepherd.  It is a cross between St. Bernard and Anatolian Shepherd.  Apparently, the dogs have the St. Bernard people-friendly attitude (unlike Anatolian) but still have the LGD instinct of the Anatolian.  This is the only info I can find on it on the web: Grand Shepherd

Do any permies out there know anything about this breed?

The reason I am inquiring about this is because I talked to a farmer today who is moving and selling all their livestock and their LGD, a grand shepherd.  It sounds like a great fit for us but I want to get a little more info on them.

 
Ben Zumeta
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Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
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i am pretty sure I have seen this referred to for a mix of Great Pyrenees, German Shephard, and Malamute. Grand shepherd is a great name. My Great Pyrenees-Anatolian (Akbash) is a great dog, with puppifying capabilities if one is in need of the greatest genes ever.
 
Dan Ohmann
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Redwood Country...zone 9.... I'd love to see the greatest genes ever but I'm guessing you're further than a days drive from me.  Thanks for the reply Ben!
 
Dave Dahlsrud
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Dan
Is the shepherd a male or female?  That sounds like a pretty good cross for what you guys are wanting to do, also I have an in tact male Great Pyrenees/Anatolian if you want to do some breeding in the future and I'm only a couple hours from your place.
 
Dave Dahlsrud
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So I just clicked your link to the breeder's site....man those are some really nice dogs.  If your farmer friend's dog is a female I'd be really interested in either breeding her or if you decide it's not a good fit for you maybe you could send me their info in a PM.....
 
Liz Hoxie
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Location: Ellisforde, WA
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Sounds like a good mix, especially for a farm dog. If it's a female, don't breed her until she's 3. LGDs sometimes only go into season once a year, but sometimes have "silent" heats. The reason for the 3 years is that her bone plates need to close. Their heat cycles may not start until they're over a year old, but start watching when they're 6 months old, some start younger.
 
Dan Ohmann
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Dave Dahlsrud wrote:Dan
Is the shepherd a male or female?  That sounds like a pretty good cross for what you guys are wanting to do, also I have an in tact male Great Pyrenees/Anatolian if you want to do some breeding in the future and I'm only a couple hours from your place.


The dog in question is a male.  It didn't work out though. 
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
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I can't see any evidence on that website that they have actually created a stable "new breed".  They only seem to be talking about first crosses between purebred Anatolians and St Bernards.  Which isn't to say these aren't great dogs, but you can't assume that you could then cross GS with GS and get a consistent result, so it's not a true breed.
 
Liz Hoxie
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I always liked the idea of the ancient breeds. Tried and true gets my vote every time. "New" tends to bother me. Must be why I like yard sales.
 
Dan Ohmann
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Thank you Hester and Liz.  I sent an email and a text message to the folks that run that website and I've yet to hear back.  I was wanting to gather some more information.  If I hear back I'll let you know. 
 
Cheryl Hume
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Location: Yelm, WA
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I actually have a female from this breeder.  She just turned two in January and we couldn't be happier with our choice of LGD (yes I know that the St Bernard X makes her not a true LGD according to many). From what I recall, my Stella was a second generation cross (not sure if I've stated that correct) -  Meaning the sire and bitch were both 50/50 St Bernard and Anatolian crosses.   We live on two acres and looked into several different options for LGD's but because of the close proximity to our neighbors we didn't want a dog that would be barking 24x7 nor one that would be inclined to roam (roaming dogs out here get shot when they trespass).  She does bark, but not constant and not at the slightest branch movement like some dogs.  She lives with our goats (has since we brought her home) and is really good with them.  We've even gone thru one kidding season so far with the goats and she's done very well with the babies.  She is good with people who we bring on our property and is still super protective when strangers walk down the road in front of our house.  She's also good at catching moles and rodents (yuck).  We are looking at adding another one of Michelle's dogs to our property when we move this summer (to more land).    I've attached pictures of our Stella from this past summer (at about 18 months).  Dan, do you know what happened to the male he was trying to rehome?
stella.jpg
[Thumbnail for stella.jpg]
 
Dan Ohmann
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Thank you Cheryl for that info.  I was corresponding a little with the breeder but she got busy with lambing season and I haven't heard back from her in awhile. 

As for the dog that needed a new home, if you send me a PM I can get you in touch with the sellers.  I don't know if the dog was sold or not. 
 
Devin Lavign
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Thanks for your input Cheryl. Nice to get some 1st hand accounts with this new "breed". I do agree with others that I am not sure if this is actually a stable breed as yet, but your comment shows they are working on it and it sounds like it is on it's way toward stable.

I bookmarked this thread when it came out. I will be looking for a LGD in the future when I am ready to add livestock to my homestead. But that is still years away. It will be interesting to hear how these Grand Shepherds progress over time and if any issues or added benefits come to light as the breed stabilizes and becomes it's own and more people can come forward with their experiences.
 
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