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how or where do you store your cast iron? rack ideas  RSS feed

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Some day, we would like a lovely pan rack above the island in the Fisher Price House kitchen. We're not there yet, and we're out of both cupboard and wall space, so I found these nifty racks at Costco.



(uff - that's a lousy image!)

We keep serious grease/oil/fat in the pans, and helpful housecleaners keep stacking them together, inside each other. Which greases the bottom of the pan that is placed inside a larger pan. Not good for the stove top. These racks are okay for now, but I'm still dreaming about something better.

So I searched permies and I found a couple examples.

David has this lovely pot rack:


(more about it here)

Delilah hangs hers on the wall:


(in her post about the drying rack hanging above/front of them)

What else do you have or suggest? How do you store your heavy and greasy cast iron?

 
wayne fajkus
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We keep ours in the oven, or on the stovetop. But it's 2 pieces plus lid and a bacon press.
 
Steven Kovacs
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Our 3 skillets (and tortilla press, and griddle) go in the drawer at the bottom of the oven.  I have stored cast iron in the oven before but don't recommend it unless you 1) keep it relatively dry of oil or 2) remember to take it out before preheating the oven.  Oily pans create a lot of smoke.
 
Carol Nelson
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I have two racks in my kitchen area, one over the wood cookstove and one over the island. I got those racks from Amazon and couldn't be happier with them. I also have a monster rack in the basement near another woodstove that holds the cast iron I'm not currently using. I think hanging racks are the way to go with cast iron.
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Jocelyn Campbell
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Carol Nelson wrote:I have two racks in my kitchen area, one over the wood cookstove and one over the island. I got those racks from Amazon and couldn't be happier with them. I also have a monster rack in the basement near another woodstove that holds the cast iron I'm not currently using. I think hanging racks are the way to go with cast iron.


Yay for pictures! Welcome to permies, Carol and thanks for the awesome examples!

I've always wondered if folks worry about the weight of heavy pan racks attached to the ceiling. Yours look plenty sturdily attached though.



 
Travis Johnson
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We have a pretty big kitchen (24 x 24) so we dedicated cupboard space under our meat preparation area to hang our skillets, pots and frying pans. We also put dowels in to the cupboard next to it to keep cookie sheets, cutting boards and the like separated.
 
Carol Nelson
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Yes, Jocelyn, they are very firmly attached. My husband is quite dedicated to sturdiness and I think they could hold a lot more weight.

One rack is screwed well into the ceiling joists (is that the right word??) and the other is screwed to a board that is screwed into the joists. That was done in order to center it the way I wanted.

Anyway, I love the setup. It is so much easier to get to my pans that I use every day.
 
Les Van Valkenburgh
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We don't keep ours hung up, would like to, but old house with small kitchen, apparently 'back in the day' the kitchen wasn't as important for a big room as it is now.
We just stack them up and store in the oven. Yup, got to remember to take them out when preheating the oven, get pretty hot if you forget Lol!
They do not have to be oily, wipe them out under hot water, toss them on the burner to dry them out and put a thin layer of oil on them. I like to use just a few drops of oil and wipe it around when it's HOT with a coffee filter, paper towel sucks too much off IMHO.
 
Les Van Valkenburgh
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Carol Nelson wrote:I have two racks in my kitchen area, one over the wood cookstove and one over the island. I got those racks from Amazon and couldn't be happier with them. I also have a monster rack in the basement near another woodstove that holds the cast iron I'm not currently using. I think hanging racks are the way to go with cast iron.

Love those racks, Awesome!
 
jonathan white
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I keep a lidded 13 inch skillet sitting in a 16 inch skillet on the bottom rack of the oven. I keep my pizza stone on the middle rack. It takes longer to preheat but the thermal mass keeps it really hot which is awesome for baking and even more awesome for pizza night when you have to open it every ten minutes to rotate a pie or put in a new one
 
jonathan white
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But I also have a couple shelves in the kitchen loaded with cookware
 
Walt Chase
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Carol Nelson wrote:I have two racks in my kitchen area, one over the wood cookstove and one over the island. I got those racks from Amazon and couldn't be happier with them. I also have a monster rack in the basement near another woodstove that holds the cast iron I'm not currently using. I think hanging racks are the way to go with cast iron.


I'll second those racks.  I have them in our commercial kitchen.  They are sturdy and will hold a lot of weight if anchored as yours are into the wood joists.  Cast iron woudn't be a problem i would think. 
 
Anna Demb
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I think I have attached a photo here, but I'm not sure.

But --our rack for cast iron pans is made of rebar hanging off trimmed-down oak flooring screwed to the ceiling.

If the photo doesn't show up, could someone tell me how to add it?
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Dawn Hoff
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I have mine in a drawer in the kitchen - stacked. I don't keep grease in them: I add a little lard after drying them and burn it of on the stove before cooling and putting it away.
 
Laura Emil
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my guy used re-purposed barn scrap wood on the wall for the cast iron skillets; and we finally hung the pot hanger i bought at auction several years ago for other assorted pots/pans, which made room for a couple of dutch ovens on pantry shelving... (note the 'new' ceiling, too - metal roof from a fallen shed.  i'm liking the extra effort he made for not celebrating my big 6-0, lol!!!) 
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Casey Pfeifer
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Here's our tiny but functional kitchen inside our 16x14' canvas wall tent. I built a hanging rack out of 2x4s and screwed in some strong metal hooks for hanging the pots and pans. The chains holding it to the even larger hooks set into the ridge beam were measured to put the height of the pot rack where it was still reachable by my girlfriend yet also 3" above head hazard for several 6'6" friends. This rack is built to hold 10 pots/pans.

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Tent kitchen overhead hanging pan rack.
 
Liz Hoxie
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Jocelyn, I like the rack you got. We live in a mobile home built in the '70's. I don't trust the walls or the ceilings to hold weight, so I needed another option. I was thinking about a basket that would roll under the table to store my dutch oven and chicken fryer, but I couldn't think of anything for the skillets and corn stick pan. Thanks.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Location: Missoula, MT
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Oh my goodness, SO many good pictures since I last visited this thread! Thank you, thank you for all of the eye candy! (I doled out some apples. )

I found another epic pot rack from an architect friend who designed this cabin on Whidbey Island in Washington State.



Edited to add source.
 
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