• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Uses for a Sour Sumac Reduction  RSS feed

 
Charlie Michaels
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Last fall I got a whole bunch of staghorn sumac fruits from the roadside on my trip to Massachusetts, then I brought them back home to NJ. What I did was I soaked them all for a day in water, then I boiled that water down to a concentrated "essence of sumac", basically a light brown sour tasting liquid. Then I put the concentration is a jar in the fridge, thinking I'd use it sometime in the winter.

Now I KNOW there's gotta be some uses for a unique sour taste like that, but I just can't think of any. Anyone have any ideas?
 
                            
Posts: 158
Location: Abilene, KS
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Beats me.. If we have those out here, I don't know about them.  I kinda lean towards sweet stuff instead of sour.  Could you use it in some kind of oriental cabbage type dish?
 
Joe Skeletor
Posts: 113
Location: Blue Island, Illinois - Zone 6a - (Lake Effect) - surrounded by zone 5b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off the top of my head, I'd say -

Add it to a gin and tonic for a sour kick.  Other mixed drinks of sorts.

Use it to replace lemon juice in hummus dip.

Make an interesting dessert with it (think of lemon poppyseed cake, key-lime pie, ect..)

you know, replace sour with sour!

I've had Sumac water and just drank it like lemonade, but I'd never thought of reducing it. Very interesting!.


 
                            
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In my family, we use it frequently.
Wait it in water for 1-2 hours then use this water for cooking eggplant, green pepper and tomatoes.
Don't forget to use red pepper flakes with sumac.
You get a hot and sour taste. I like it!
 
                                    
Posts: 147
Location: Anoka Sand Plain, MN Zone 4/5, Sunset Zone 43
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well it's supposed to make a lemonade substitute when fresh.  You can get it in a dried form at middle eastern groceries mixed with herbs and spices (mostly thyme k thknk).  it's called zatar and is great on flatbread.
 
Charlie Michaels
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, these are all great ideas. For anyone with sumac in their area, I encourage you to try this too.
 
Andy Cook
Posts: 44
Location: Alaska
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
People in the middle east add sumac to lamb and tomato dishes.  Its really delicious.
 
Lee Einer
Posts: 169
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
christhamrin wrote:
Well it's supposed to make a lemonade substitute when fresh.  You can get it in a dried form at middle eastern groceries mixed with herbs and spices (mostly thyme k thknk).  it's called zatar and is great on flatbread.


Zatar is typically a blend of middle-eastern marjoram, sesame seeds, salt and other flavorings.

The sumac is also available in middle-eastern groceries - it is a dark red, dried seasoning called semet. Pronounced like "cement" without the "n."

Definitely tart and sprinkled as a garnish on appetizers like hummus and baba ganoush.
 
Let's go to the waterfront with this tiny ad:
Learn, Design, Teach, & Inspire with Permaculture games.
FoodForestCardGame.com
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!