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Eczema and some things that may be helping (lard, coconut oil, nettle tea). More ideas?  RSS feed

 
Dawn Hoff
Posts: 469
Location: Andalucía, Spain
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Hi there!
My son and I have been fighting eczema most of our lives... in some cases so bad that we had staph-infections. We have tried almost everything, including total elimination diets, paleo, AIP etc. - not really any luck. OK - I had a really hard time with AIP... not having neither eggs, milk, seeds nor nightshades... on top of the regular Paleo diet is hard! And I eat way more meat that way...). Last year I developed hand eczema - so horrible that the skin was litteraly falling of my hands. I have been avoiding cortical steroids for years on myself, but I this time I felt I had not choice... I have been using steroids for my son, but his eczema has been way worse than mine too.

So recently I found out that my local supermarket carries Iberian lard - at €3 a kilo. I just have to render it myself. Which I am happy to do because it is way way way cheaper than coconut oil, and local and heritage pigs and free range mostly eating acorns. What's not to love right?

When I grind the lard I usually end up with a lot on my hands and they felt SO good! So I started taking a little bit and using it instead of cream. I asked my son to do the same - he hates all creams, I have been trying 100 different creams and natural oils on him and he always complains that they itch. But lard doesn't - he uses it voluntarily and it has helped his skin tremendously.

Recently I started making bullet proof coffee for me and my husband in the morning, and then I tried making bullet proof chai, and I made that for my son too with coconut oil and no butter - and when we ran out of chai, my son asked for nettle tea. Currently he drinks 2-4 cups of nettle tea with organic honey and coconut oil blended in every day - and his eczema is almost gone. We are of course continuing using the lard for cream and I do think that it is a combination - but the tea is definitely a contributing factor.

A friend of mine suggested that I gave him activated charcoal - in case he was trying to cleanse through the skin, most toxins could be sucked up by the charcoal. I have been doing that today and yesterday - but I am a little worried that the charcoal sucks up too many of the minerals he gets from his food... (that is a caution they write on the label of the charcoal pills), but OTOH the nettle tea is so smack full of minerals, that sometimes people caution that if you drink a lot it could be hard on your kidneys... OTOH maybe the minerals in the nettle tea is what is helping him heal (like a sea-water bath or eating extra himalaya sea salt often helps with eczema and allergies).  Maybe I should just be happy with my current results and not give him the charcoal.

Any ideas? (This thing about going outside the mainstream in medicine is really hard, because you have to think for yourself all the time).
 
Marla Kacey
Posts: 127
Location: Wyoming Zone 4
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I had some pretty serious eczema on my hands and legs - roadmaps on the backs of my hands, flaking and bleeding on my legs.  And then I tried making my own lye soap - lard, coconut oil and a couple of organic additives.  It was better than any of the expensive creams or soaps I had purchased in many years, and far less expensive!

If you have access to organic/natural lard, you are way ahead of me!  I started out with Wally World lard and only then learned about all the nastiness that might be present.  I looking for affordable natural lard now.

Best of luck to you.  I know how uncomfortable and even embarrassing eczema can be.
 
Dawn Hoff
Posts: 469
Location: Andalucía, Spain
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Marla Kacey wrote:I had some pretty serious eczema on my hands and legs - roadmaps on the backs of my hands, flaking and bleeding on my legs.  And then I tried making my own lye soap - lard, coconut oil and a couple of organic additives.  It was better than any of the expensive creams or soaps I had purchased in many years, and far less expensive!

If you have access to organic/natural lard, you are way ahead of me!  I started out with Wally World lard and only then learned about all the nastiness that might be present.  I looking for affordable natural lard now.

Best of luck to you.  I know how uncomfortable and even embarrassing eczema can be.

I will try to get my husband to use lard next time he makes soap - thank you 😊
 
Marla Kacey
Posts: 127
Location: Wyoming Zone 4
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What does he currently use to make soap?
 
Dawn Hoff
Posts: 469
Location: Andalucía, Spain
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Marla Kacey wrote:What does he currently use to make soap?
olive oil - but it has been a while and I have had to buy oil at my herbalist (and even if it says perfume free it smells like lemon, so I'm guessing it has essential oils in it...). Will have him make some soap again ASAP.
 
Linda Secker
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Location: Lancaster, UK
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Eczema - such an awful thing - anyone who hasn't experienced it has NO idea.....
I know what you mean about the lard. I have managed to eliminate my eczema from all but one hand... and that patch really responds well to 'squeezing meat to make burgers' !!!

to get to this point however - we use NO soap powder, I use NO soap - and also limit exposure to water.... but we also now have no pets - all animals really upset my skin....
 
Dawn Hoff
Posts: 469
Location: Andalucía, Spain
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Linda Secker wrote:Eczema - such an awful thing - anyone who hasn't experienced it has NO idea.....
I know what you mean about the lard. I have managed to eliminate my eczema from all but one hand... and that patch really responds well to 'squeezing meat to make burgers' !!!

to get to this point however - we use NO soap powder, I use NO soap - and also limit exposure to water.... but we also now have no pets - all animals really upset my skin....

How about clothes and after bathroom visits? And plates after eating? No soap at all?

I don't use soap when I bathe, and only bathe once a week. But I wash my hands when I have been to the bathroom and when  I cook. I use soap for doing dishes (but also use gloves), and in my laundry. I cannot imagine not doing that.
 
Marla Kacey
Posts: 127
Location: Wyoming Zone 4
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This might sound gross to some, but in public restrooms, if all they have is smelly standard soap, I just use water - lots of water and lots of scrubbing.
 
Matthew Lewis
Posts: 58
Location: Canada
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Marla Kacey wrote:This might sound gross to some, but in public restrooms, if all they have is smelly standard soap, I just use water - lots of water and lots of scrubbing.


I also generally just use water. Some of the soaps have such strong scents my hands smell for hours. Those scents and antibacterial agents contain hormone disruptive chemicals.
 
Linda Secker
Posts: 75
Location: Lancaster, UK
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Hi Dawn

I don't use any laundry detergent any more at all. My whites look a bit grey, but hey, i don#t itch I use a spoonful of washing soda crystals and hang out on the line any time the weather is dry. Our clothes smell clean!

Washing up? Yes, I DO use dish liquid - can't imagine how to do it otherwise - but always wear gloves (I need to avoid too much water on my hands) and always rinse off the dishes with plain water. Also, my hubby is a good washer-upper

face - no soap, ever. body, no soap, ever. Pits and crotch - you got it, don't care how gross it sounds, but no soap, ever. Hands - I use a tiny bit of very mild home-made soap only if my hands are actually DIRTY. I do rinse my hands OFTEN though - dozens of times a day probably. After bathroom visits - never at home, but if I have to 'go' in a public bathroom, I might consider the soap if the facilities are less than spotless.... but my skin really suffers for it... I DO still use shampoo on my hair - I've tried the no-poo regimen, but my hair just looked and felt utterly skanky. I hated it.
 
Roy Hinkley
Posts: 241
Location: S. Ontario Canada
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If I get a problem patch I either squeeze some comfrey leaf juice on then cover or take a comfrey leaf , stick that on some surgical (or duct) tape and lay that right on the cracked skin and leave overnight.
Nitrile gloves work well overnight for hands.
Both work but the comfrey leaf poultice leaves the skin feeling normal for a week.
 
Emma Jacob
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Foods containing Essential fatty acids - wild caught fish, flaxseed oil reduce symptoms.  Pumpkin , Chia seeds contain zinc essential for wound healing and for metabolizing fatty acids.
Other very effective solutions include coconut oil, jojoba, soothing butter,gycerine and water.
 
Henry Jabel
Posts: 126
Location: Worcestershire, England
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Getting out in the sun as much as possible really helps my eczema so much so I only really get it in winter now. All the usual anti inflammatory foods are really good too e.g camomile, ginger and turmeric. Dandelion is also good as its anti inflammatory and stress relieving which is usually a trigger for me.
 
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