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Mediumish scale composting techniques

 
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So I searched the forums and couldn't find what I am looking for, so if the answer is already there I apologize and thank you for pointing me in the correct direction .
So I am looking at the beginning stages of a farm that will produce pork, mushrooms, microgreens, and nuts/fruit. As I sit here in the planning stages I am looking at my circles and see a bit of organic waste coming out in the way of manure, spent mushroom substrate, roots and nut hulls. In other words another product, compost. I am poking around the Internet looking for solutions as far as compost turning, will need to keep it hot to sanitize the pig manure. Does anyone have a low input solution that doesn't involve large lines of compost and industrial tractors. I was thinking along the lines of bins with a shafts full of tines driven by a motor. Any ideas on bins and or easier solutions (I tend to or think things). Thanks
 
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Jeremy Solum wrote:So I searched the forums and couldn't find what I am looking for, so if the answer is already there I apologize and thank you for pointing me in the correct direction .
So I am looking at the beginning stages of a farm that will produce pork, mushrooms, microgreens, and nuts/fruit. As I sit here in the planning stages I am looking at my circles and see a bit of organic waste coming out in the way of manure, spent mushroom substrate, roots and nut hulls. In other words another product, compost. I am poking around the Internet looking for solutions as far as compost turning, will need to keep it hot to sanitize the pig manure. Does anyone have a low input solution that doesn't involve large lines of compost and industrial tractors. I was thinking along the lines of bins with a shafts full of tines driven by a motor. Any ideas on bins and or easier solutions (I tend to or think things). Thanks



There are several commercial built tumblers on the market or you could build your own out of wood so even it would become compost eventually.
 
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A small tractor with a front loader would work well. Not sure what you mean by industrial tractor.

Have you considered worms? It would be less dependant on machines. I've seen leftover pig bits from slaughtering fed to them, but it took grinding it into small bits.
 
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Chickens are excellent at turning compost:



 
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" I am poking around the Internet looking for solutions as far as compost turning, will need to keep it hot to sanitize the pig manure. "

Your biggest friend might be time. If you really want to go simple, stack materials together out of the way and forget them for a few years. They'll be safe to use and will take little work.
 
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Chickens are supposed to love compost, but mine only want to scratch through the finished compost!
Assuming normal chickens, your pig bits should be gobbled right up.
For bones,eggshells,roots and nut hulls, I suggest making biochar.
Toss that into the deep litter in the chicken house.
The manure and mushroom substrate sound like worm food,chickens should like it too.

 
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Hi Jeremy,  
I was thinking this same thing last month...

Here are a few ideas...
http://www.ecovrs.com/en/products/in-vessel-composting/ridan-composter/
http://forsolutionsllc.com/in-vessel-composting-system/

I could see some ways that these engineered designs could be copied by a crafty DIYer.  Who knows maybe an efficient unit like those might be able to help warm a greenhouse...

 
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