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Rabbit Manure Treated As Humanure?

 
Francis Graf
Posts: 8
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Going to begin increasing my rabbit production, and am planning ahead for dealing with waste.  Id like to process it first rather than use it "cold", as I am in an urban/suburban environment.

Im trying to decide between building a new and bigger vermicompost bin to handle the extra load, or getting some wheeled garbage bins and doing layered thermophilic composting like many do with humanure.

Will the rabbit manure create the necessary conditions for proper compost, like in these types of setups?

https://www.milkwood.net/2011/11/25/wheelie-bin-trailers-for-humanure/


Id appreciate any thoughts or input on the matter.  Thanks!
 
Su Ba
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I'm a follower of the K.I.S.S. principle, but I don't see anything wrong with using complicated methods as long as it works for you. Any sort of composting works with rabbit manure. In my own system, I store excess rabbit manure in old feed sacks until I need it. As long as the manure is damp when it went into the sack, it naturally heats slightly and breaksdown on its own as time goes by. The drier it is, the less it breaksdown. I store the bags in an airy full-shade spot, thus I don't get odor from it.

I have added rabbit manure to my hot compost piles and it heats up just fine. I don't use vermiculite, so I have no experience for you there.
 
William Bronson
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? Rabbit poop is good strait,no need for composting.
 
Su Ba
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I didn't mean vermiculite (dang auto correct!). I meant vermiculture.
 
Maureen Atsali
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Location: Western Kenya
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I don't compost rabbit manure.  It goes straight into the garden, and the garden loves it.  It is virtually odorless and breaks down quickly, so why make extra work for yourself?
 
Francis Graf
Posts: 8
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Hey guys thanks for the feedback. 

Im a big fan of KISS as well, but I have found that the amount of simple I can keep is directly proportional to the space I have.
Unfortunately my lot is small.  If I had the space I would just dig a trench and toss the manure in there with some woodchips, and eventually start an asparagus bed there.

Also my raised beds are full, and the kids and dogs running around make spreading rabbit pellets around an unattractive option.
My compost pile is already too big, and I want to stop putting anything but leaves and chips in it from now on, so I dont have to turn it.

I already have a worm bin, and find the castings to have added value over the manure, so its good to hear the worms will eat it fresh.

I considered the garbage bin as a fairly simple alternative to the worm bin, its basically the same as using old feed bags as Su Ba suggested. 
Just fill them up with the occasional layer of sawdust, and let sit for 6 months. 
The only reason I would use a garbage bin over something else, is ease of transport, better use of vertical space, and aesthetics.

Guess Ill build my new plus sized worm bin, and then consider the passive compost method for any overflow, a backup of sorts.

Thanks for the input!
 
Rebecca Norman
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Those wheelie bins on Milkwood are not so simple. They avoid smelly anaerobic decomposition by having a raised mesh bottom and a ventilation tube. That's why Su Ba's sack system is different, and much simpler.
 
Francis Graf
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Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Oh I see, thanks for the heads up! 

I dont mind putting in the initial work for something like that. 

For this application though I wonder if some vent holes near the top, small drain holes at the bottom, and a 6" layer of chips in the bottom would be sufficient?

Ill have to do some experimenting if the worm bin cant handle the volume.
 
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