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Woven wire goat fence for pigs?  RSS feed

 
Devin Smith
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Hi all, I'm getting some pigs soon and I was wondering if some woven wire goat fence would hold them in.

I've found a lot of info about using it in combination with hot wire, but not really on using it alone. I am hoping to avoid hot wire as I recently bought a charger and battery for my goats and I really don't want to have expensive energy consuming equipment all over the place. I have a bunch of this 12.5 guage woven wire and t-posts laying around already from a previous project.

This stuff withstood big goats climbing, headbutting, etc no problem so I'm thinking it might work with pigs? I should also mention that I am only allowing the pigs to live for 6-8 months before slaughter, so they won't have a chance to get too big. I don't want to keep any overwinter for breeders at all.

Does anyone have any direct experience using this kind of fencing for pigs without hot wire? If this won't work without hot wire, would hog panels do the trick?
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Travis Johnson
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Electric fence energizers really do not consume a lot of power because they are not constantly applying voltage to the line. You will be better off with a fence/hot wire combination to keep your pigs from putting to much pressure on the fence. With bare skin, they tend to respect electric fences a bit more then woven wire.

Being a sheep farmer I have a lot of woven wire fence up, but at one time ran beef cattle in with my sheep WITHOUT an offset hot wire. After a few times of the cattle getting out and ruining large sections o fence I had a decision to make: $2000 in beef or $37,000 in fencing. It was a pretty easy decision to make. We don't have beef on this farm, but I easily could if I ran an offset wire.
 
thomas rubino
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Hi devin;  Yes , its taller than you need for pigs but woven wire works perfect. Welded wire will pop the welds when a pig pushes against it.  Make sure your posts are on the outside of your fence and I highly recommend burying it at least   1' underground. Another trick is to use old metal roofing laid horizontal, bury it part way as well (same trench) .
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Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Burying fencing can't be done easily where I'm located. Too many rocks. And when not buried,  pigs can figure out how to push under it. A tight strand or two of barbed wire at ground level on the inside of the fence usually deters them, but it's not 100%. I've had adult pigs snap the barbed wire or pull it off the fence posts. I found that the best solution was a single strand of hotwire run along the inside of the fence, about a foot above the ground (lower when they're piglets). I had to condition the pigs to it, but they were quick to learn. Once they learned, they never touched it.

My piglets were escape artists. Luckily my farm dog knew the moment they escaped and herded them to the house. But if they had escaped the farm.....not good. The price of the fence charger was cheap insurance compared to compensating neighbors for pig damaged landscaping. Luckily I'm far enough from a travelled road, but if somebody had hit a loose pig, I would be in big financial trouble. Even the fanciest fence charger would be cheap compared to a lawsuit or claim.

There's a lot of liability that comes with having livestock. Keeping them well fenced helps protect the owner.
 
Walter Jeffries
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Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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Works well when combined with electric. Without the electric the pigs may stick their noses in and open up holes in the fence. I use this type of fence as part of my favorite pig and piglet proof perimeters. See:
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2015/11/17/pig-proof-fence/
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