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Siberian Elm Guild Ideas?

 
Posts: 2
Location: Melba, United States
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Hello,

We're working on transforming our new place. The only trees currently growing are a bunch of mature Siberian Elms. I'd like to start planting around them and take advantage of their nice canopy.

I'd love to hear suggestions of understory trees, bushes, etc. that produce fruit/nuts and would play nice with the elms. We're in zone 7b with an annual average rainfall of 11 inches. We do have access to irrigation, but will be employing other methods to reduce the amount of irrigation we'll need to use. Our soil is fairly alkaline, around 7.5.

Thank you!

Michelle in SW Idaho
 
gardener
Posts: 1358
Location: Maine, zone 5
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I don't have any experience with Siberian Elm, but I was just curious, are you eating the samaras?  I read that they're good in Sam Thayer's book.  Good luck!
 
Michelle Anderson
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Location: Melba, United States
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Huh. The thought to see if those were edible hadn't crossed my mind. Our goats sure love them- that would have been a clue!

I'll have to give them a whirl when they come in. We have so many, it would be great to find a use for them!

Thank you!

Michelle in SW Idaho
 
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Eat the weeds has a nice article about that.

Eat the weeds
 
Posts: 248
Location: Ellisforde, WA
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I have no ideas, but I'm watching this thread. We have what is called around here "piss elm". I THINK it's a Siberian Elm. Someone said something about it once, but I informed them of 2 facts. 1) it is the ONLY tree around here and it gives us shade, and 2) we don't have to water it. My kind of plant.
 
pollinator
Posts: 240
Location: Northern New Mexico, Zone 5b
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Be aware that Siberian Elm and Chinese Elm are two different trees.  The article Miles posted is about Chinese Elms. A nicer tree I think.

Here is a paper on Siberian Elm you might find interesting
Siberian Elm

This paper suggests Siberian Elms are allelopathic but indicates information is incomplete.  If they are strongly allelopathic, finding a guild may be tricky.

Siberian Elms are a pest where I live.  I've removed a few but haven't encouraged any.  So, I don't have any specific guild ideas.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Liz Hoxie wrote:We have what is called around here "piss elm".



Lol, we have an elm here that I used to hear called that when I was a kid.  I have no idea why and don't know what it's real name is.  Thanks for the laugh, I haven't heard that phrase in a long time.

Update:  A quick Google search says that "piss elm" is American Elm, and called that because of the smell it gives off when cut or burned.
 
Liz Hoxie
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I did the search a few years ago and found the same thing. That's why I was so confused. I knew that it wasn't American Elm. The closest fit was Siberian. The download here proved it. That's the same bark. Hubby confirmed it.
 
Greg Martin
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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https://wildfoodgirl.com/2016/elm-samaras-edible-gourmet/
Check out Wild Food Girl's post on Siberian Elm samaras...making me weak....starting to want to plant a couple.
 
Liz Hoxie
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Location: Ellisforde, WA
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Want some seed? I'll still have some after trying them in a salad.I'll still be playing Paul Bunyan all summer.
 
Greg Martin
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I'd love some seed, thank you Liz!  PM sent.
 
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