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Sheep Expansion Start  RSS feed

 
Travis Johnson
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We have not got all our numbers yet for the bank as my logging accident put me back on that, but we are at a point where we know we need to expand. It would be easier with the bank to help finance it instead of ourselves, but we are not about sit around and talk about things either. Today we started. As my good friend always says, "Just start. Always finish strong, but you have to start."

One of our barns is 500 feet away from our house and it is a pain to shuttle animals back and forth that far, so moving it is a big part of the plan. It is 24 x 48 so a sizable barn to move, but can accommodate 100 extra sheep...definitely worth moving. (I am already using it inconveniently and paying property taxes on it). Then we plan to move another smaller shed into position here as well so that we can have an area dedicated just to veterinarian care of the sheep. But a junk shed and our chicken coop was in the way of where we want to connect them to our lambing barn, so today down came the chicken coop.

That unto itself is kind of funny because it was kind of the taj ma hal of chicken coops; nothing to look at from the outside, but it was super insulated, had a concrete floor, had lights, outlets, shelving, a separate grain area, self closing doors so the chickens could not get past the kids, and even had Geo-Thermal heat to keep the eggs coming all winter. Just in the wrong spot, so after salvaging the steel roof and some chicken paraphernalia, the bulldozer took care of the coop! My wife and I laughed because here we just destroyed a perfectly sound building. It sounds idiotic until you realize that is how we live our lives, not holding onto nostalgia, but always improving on what we got so things get better here. Now that lambing season is over, our ducks and chickens can stay there until their new coop is built...and yes with all the amenities.

A lot of work ahead for sure, but as my good friend said, "You have to start." Today we started, a red letter day indeed.

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Tj Jefferson
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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Oh man, it's so true. I hear about planning all your roads and buildings but there are things you have to work around and then you decide, "Dude I am not working around this one second longer!" Many change with your situation, and you have to roll with it.

Case in point, my greenhouse (came with the property) is totally in the wrong spot. No water access no power access. about as far from the house as you can get. I use it to store stuff for the silvopasture project, have never sprouted anything there. But this is a $2500 structure on an $1000 pad (I have receipts). That gets no light in the winter/spring and is baked all summer. When I can't stand it anymore I will move it but for right now I just look at it and wonder at the lack of planning.

Travis good to hear you are back taking names up there.

 
Travis Johnson
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Still not running at 100% as I had to take three breaks throughout the day, but still managed to get something done. Like everything there is a whole series of steps involved in this project, along with every project, and so it is best to just to plod along, but a lot easier to stay in motion once the project is moving along.

As for your greenhouse...ROAD TRIP! (I actually wish I could, what an an encouragement that would be to both me and you...or whomever homestead I stopped at. I can picture it, just spending a few days providing advice and encouragement, and of course free labor and camaraderie so homesteaders do not give up hope, making friends along the way maybe in exchange for a bed or a meal...sounds perfect for a retired 42 year old workaholic...an oxy-moron if there ever was one).

But I would love to help you in that regard. Buildings are actually easier to move then most people think, and from a frugality point of view; well worth doing. And surprisingly it does not take a big machine to move things around. Last year they moved a really large one room school house 5 miles up some pretty big hills with 4 draft horses for the historical society. And these two building moves will be 5 and 6 for me and this year I have a bulldozer and skidder in assistance so I see no reason why it should be a huge deal to get done. The concrete pad would have to stay, but you can always reuse it. The pad I am going to leave behind is part of my overall plan as well...a silage pad so I stay in compliance with USDA rules.
 
I think I'll just lie down here for a second. And ponder this tiny ad:
50% discount one time offer for consultations or projects in Europe
https://permies.com/t/64816/discount-time-offer-consultations-projects
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