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Patching a synthetic quilt?  RSS feed

 
N Thomas
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Hi everyone,
I have a synthetic quilt (stuffing & outer cover) that is beginning to fray on a corner seam. Unfortunately, the tag showing the materials of manufacture has faded into illegibility so I can't be sure of the precise manufacture. It doesn't look easily sewable. Is it possible to patch?
 
Kate Muller
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Yes you can patch that damaged section.  If you could post a photo of the damaged section I can let you know how to go about it.  How to repair it depends on what part is damaged.  The binding is the fabric on outer edge of a quilt and it can be covered or replaced.  If the main body of fabric has worn then you will need create a patch for it.  Luckily quilts usually have a pieced fabric design and you can easily create a repair that looks cool even if the fabric isn't a perfect match.  The photo will also help me find links to fabric for you. 
 
Sherri Lynn
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In addition to the suggestions already made (great suggestions!), you could also do something on the order of a duvet cover, looking at this as an opportunity to freshen up the decor in your room and possibly adding some cotton containing fabric for comfort.  Some thrift store curtains might contain the fabric you need cheaply.  I have taken a quilt that was given to me and made coordinating pillow shams to use it for my bedspread.  If you don't sew, you might be able to find duvet cover in a clearance section.  Alternatively, if the fraying is on an edge, you could cover it with a wide blanket binding around the edge, even using some iron on seam tape if you don't sew.

If sewing is not an issue, perhaps if one corner is frayed, you could cover all four corners in a fabric you like to make it look deliberate.  Or if it is not conveniently located, coming up with a unique applique might add to it.  For example, my husband needed some knee patches for his jeans, so I used some other Jeans with bad knees to turn them into shorts and use the excess material to patch his knees in a skull applique (making it more interesting for both of us.)  If you are worried about your art work, just make a pattern by printing out a general pattern from the internet.  Coloring book like pictures make great applique patterns with their simple lines.
 
N Thomas
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Kate Muller wrote:Yes you can patch that damaged section.  If you could post a photo of the damaged section I can let you know how to go about it.  How to repair it depends on what part is damaged.  The binding is the fabric on outer edge of a quilt and it can be covered or replaced.  If the main body of fabric has worn then you will need create a patch for it.  Luckily quilts usually have a pieced fabric design and you can easily create a repair that looks cool even if the fabric isn't a perfect match.  The photo will also help me find links to fabric for you. 

Hi Kate,
Sorry for my delayed response. I have uploaded 2 photos that show worn sections of the quilt and 1 photo that shows an intact portion of the quilt. What do you recommend based on the uploaded photos?
FYI: I have no sewing skills so would prefer solutions that minimize sewing.
Thanks!
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Kate Muller
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The easiest way to repair it is to fold the damaged parts inside the comforter and hand sew the opening closed with a Blind Ladder stitch.
Here is a video of someone using it to close a pillow. 

 
N Thomas
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Kate Muller wrote:The easiest way to repair it is to fold the damaged parts inside the comforter and hand sew the opening closed with a Blind Ladder stitch.
Here is a video of someone using it to close a pillow. 


Thanks Kate, I'll check out the video.
 
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