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These are the stories that microbes tell  RSS feed

 
jars lyfe
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Hey all,
So microbes are a hot topic these days. A lot of people are talking about them and it seems to me that it is an eager topic to get discussing. After first reading about microbial farming here a year ago, I looked into it. And this is what I found.

I have been looking into various forms of agricultural systems in other parts of the world, mainly Asia.
What I found astounded me. I learned that many of these systems of farming basically involved gathering local biomass, fermenting them, then introducing them back into the land to be taken up by the plants and soil immediately. These systems of agriculture all emphasize minimizing imports by creating your own farming inputs. The ingredients you do need to import are easy to obtain and very inexpensive. These modalities were practiced for a long time and highly regarded by their practioners. Microbial based fermented teas is what the scientific community calls biofertilizers and cannot be formally referred to as fertilizers because the NPK content cannot be quantified, and should not be confused with simple anaerobic plant teas. A biofertilizer feeds the soil biology and does not necessarily feed the plants directly, and often times need to be diluted.. As relatively unknown as these systems are, there is very little research about these form of agriculture in our country, although Korean Natural Farming and JADAM is quickly becoming popular in Hawaii, as Hawaii has great Asian influence in its culture.

By fermentation, we brew microbes, explode their numbers, and have them cycle the locked nutrients for us into plant available forms. These bacteria being brewed are facultative whose metabolisms can adapt to both aerobic and anaerobic environments without being pathogenic (notably lactic acid bacteria). This form of agriculture referred to as "natural farming" (not Fukuoka! Fukuoka farming is do-nothing no fertilizing, the natural farmer absolutely fertilizes), in the sense that the farmer uses the local biomass and even forest/garden soil around them to create their own highly effective, inexpenisve biofertilizers and other farm-made inputs, usually by means of fermentation. They have since learned through their own trial and error that the best way to grow comes from feeding their soils a diversity of microbes, sourced anaerobically and aerobically alike, to create living active soils for means of annual production, opposed to focusing traditionally on nutrients. Many of these techniques uses the shotgun approach to microbial diversity. Someone earlier in this thread said they believe that there is a better way than just "drenching the soil with microbes." The natural farmer does not agree with this, and they will responsibly drench their soil with as many microbial teas and innoculants as they can to quickly grow living soil. They do not distinguish between the good from the bad microbes (of course, they wont use anything they know has gone bad), just that they are all needed, some in smaller amounts than others, for homeostasis. Of course, this does not disregard other responsible agricultural practices. A thick layer of mulch, living roots, etc is of course still encouraged.

These systems of agriculture are very real, and very effective. The Biodynamic folks call this alchemical (well they do plant in accordance to the heavenly bodies), and the traditional Koreans and Indians call it natural. Others call it probiotic.  Many natural farmers rely on anaerobic processes as the key to their success. Some even use sea salt and sea water as inputs. I've come to learn that the West is trying to reinvent farming, defining Organic, etc, but the Far East and India simply just learns from its ancient roots of agriCulture. There is no need to purchase NPK or fancy brewing contraptions. As a natural farmer, all the fertilizer you need is already around you, in the plants and in the land, ready for fermentation for quick availability, and all the simple tools you need are already on hand. The key, is coming realize that. Here are some tools to help you.

Korean Natural Farming, developed in the 60s by Dr. Cho, or "Master Cho", is about collecting Indigenous Micro Organisms (I-M-O), spawning them, feeding and multiplying them to get them nice and strong, and reintroduce back into the soil in via a extremely fungal based mesothilic produced compost. It is a complicated process, termed I.M.O. 1-4, that takes 2 weeks to collect your I-M-Os, which is shelf stable and can then be stored for future batches, and another 2 weeks to grow them out, which is again shelf stable. The final product of the indigenous micro organisms process is not a biofertilizer, but a highly fungal compost. Its all about getting the fungal framework established, and the belief is once the fungi are established, the rest of the soil biology will fall into place.  The theory is that since the genetics are already adapted to the soil conditions, they will thrive. And just like any other compost, you apply repeatedly to ensure the soil gets properly innoculated. Some of the other main ingredients are fermented plant juices from young leaves using raw sugar to extract  biostimulants, enzymes and hormones via osmotic pressure. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB serum) is an important part of KNF, made using rice wash water and milk.  They make use of vinegar to create water soluble calcium/phosphourus from bones, eggshells and oyster shells. There are more inputs and they are all made from cheap and easily accessible sources. Lastly, Korean Natural farmers are known for their odorless swine and poultry operations, as they spray lactic acid bacteria in the pens and make special microbial inoculated deep litter bedding that decomposes animal waste rapidly and eats the odor causing bacteria. I almost forgot to include that!

JADAM farming, which is a Korean acronym for "people who are like Nature", was developed in the 90's by Dr. Cho's son, Youngsan Cho! JADAM ultra low budget organic farming is an anaerobic tea system of farming, where you ferment forest soil with starchy potato water and sea salt (for nutrients), cover the lid and let that go for 36-48 hours, diluate at peak and apply. They also go into making a mix of different other potent special plant biofertilizers. JADAM does incorporate IPM into the system by providing recipes and education on how to make your own non-toxic pesticides and other IPM inputs. JADAM is gaining popularity because of its simple ease at any scale, its effectiveness, and is fast and cheap. Downside to JADAM is that these anaerobic teas smell Bad at times.

In Subhash Palekar's Zero Budget Natural Farming, Palekar was a generational farmer who turned to ayurvedic and other ancient Indian agriculture to learn from. He then consolidated his findings and simplified it so the average Indian farmer can easily employ the methods. He learned that the use of microbes, ie Lactic Acid Bacteria from whey etc, was highly effective when paired with cow manure, urine, milk, ghee etc. Panchagavya/jivumrita, "the 5 products of the cow", ferments all of the products of the cow together to create incredible biofertilizers. This liquid manure slurry is the staple of their fertility programs, but they also make use of anaerobic plant teas. The zero budget system also has their own IPM system and inputs that they make themselves.

Even in Biodynamics the special Preparations, #500-507, are fermented. The Biodynamic compost itself is traditional and aerobic and thermophilic, but the bio-dynamic-accumulator herbs that make the compost special (nettle, chamomille, oak bark, yarrow, dandelion, valerian) are all fermented. Just fermented with animal organs is all...

EM1 was developed in the 60s by Japanese microbiologist Dr. Higa. This brew of specific ratios of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and purple non sulphuric bacteria psuedomonas rhodobactor, are facultative and work well for many soils. EM1 can be further modified and fermented into different forms for different uses, AEM etc to create more, but as you do the ratios start drifting away from ideal proportions. You can use EM in your soil, add it to the compost, or ferment compostables to predigest it for the soil (Bokashi), or spray to animal bedding to remove smells. The natural farmer considers EM1 inferior to their own microbes, as the microbes in EM1 are bred in a lab whose genetics are not adapted to the local environment, and purchasing costly microbes is generally against the natural farmer philosophy of using inexpensive materials that are available to you, especially when an equal product can be made for nearly free.

Much like anything in agriculture, this topic is endless and limitless. Anyone who cares to learn more about how to make these highly effective biofertilizers for yourself, there are links provided to several websites below. Youtube has how-to videos on many of the KNF inputs, as well Indian agriculture videos on panchagavya/jivamrita. Online JADAM material is a bit more obscure, but the JADAM ultra low budget farming book can be bought on Amazon, although the shipping takes some time as the book is shipped directly out of Korea. The books on ZBNF are elusive and i have heard not translated very well

Korean Natural Farming:
http://naturalfarminghawaii.net/learn-natural-farming/application-guide/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7N2PXBKf_GE&list=PLeGHRYFVwS1zHwYqGvlEAjvq89iMs2vmz

JADAM
http://en.jadam.kr/com/com-3.html
http://naturalfarminghawaii.net/2016/07/jadam-ultra-low-cost-organic-farming/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62sRzomFRD0&app=desktop

Zero Budget Natural Farming of India, by Subhash Palekar (good English material is a real gem)
http://palekarzerobudgetspiritualfarming.org/zbnf.aspx
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrKfqBCEYTo&t=102s
http://www.vedicbooks.net/environment-plants-c-125_235.html?osCsid=sbhi144v1gqqaf5qbo4neb7kq6

KNF slight offshoot
http://theunconventionalfarmer.com/

EM1 handbook
http://www.apnan.org/APNAN%20Manual.pdf

general directory (brand new site!)
https://cascadiannaturalfarming.org/links-for-further-reading
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Great information Jars, Thanks for sharing the links. 

The microbiology of soils is a fascinating thing to study. My research focus is on the interactions of soil microbiomes, especially the bacteria / fungi symbiosis.

Redhawk
 
James Freyr
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Dude this is too cool! I am somewhat new to and totally into biological/ecological methods of gardening/food crop growing through techniques of nurturing soil & microbial life and am unfamiliar with Korean Natural Farming and JADAM. I can't wait to read more about this. Jars, thanks for the post!
 
Julia Winter
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So, if you are gathering local biomass to ferment and then apply back to the soil, it sounds like a good thing to do with unwanted species. Is that true?  For example, on my farm (OMG we bought a farm!) we have scotch broom popping up in the neglected pastures and of course lots of blackberries, this being the Pacific Northwest.  Goats and pigs like blackberries, not so much scotch broom, I'm told.  We hired a guy to chop the blackberry thickets to the ground, they are sprouting up and will be delicious to the goats and pigs that are coming in about a month.  However, I need a plan for the scotch broom.

If I went out with loppers and gathered a bunch of scotch broom, could I ferment it and use the goo (I'm guessing it would end up gooey) to fertilize my garden, or my apple trees, or my pasture?  Is this anaerobic fermentation? Can you advise me, or point me at a good resource?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Julia, you can compost, ferment partial composted, or use full ferment methods, all will work with scotch broom.  aerobic fermentation is faster to use since it will be good bacteria doing the fermenting.

I have used anaerobic ferments but only after I switched them over to aerobic bacteria with aeration. 

Jars will have more information on  the fermenting I am sure.

Redhawk
 
jars lyfe
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Heya Julia, i dont believe there is a single solution. With these systems, the possibilities and endless. I'd suggest we recall the properties of scotch broom. Doing a quick search on Permies of the properties of scotch broom, it is leguminous, but potentially allelopathic and known to cause deficiencies in the soil. Who knows what will happen if we ferment it? Lots of enzymes and other things get changed in the fermentation process.  So as a natural farmer, as well as permaculturalists, standard protocol would be to apply the the solution in small amounts and observe the effects of it.

There are 2 two ways you can go about fermenting them. JADAM has recipe that they call JADAM Liquid Fertilizer (JLF), where they add take a handful of soil and throw it in barrel with the plant materials to let ferment for 3 months. They dilute that and apply.

The other is called Fermented Plant Juices (FPJ) of Korean Natural Farming methods, where you collect young leaf shoots in the AM (for higher moisture content) and add equal parts raw sugar to it. The idea is to get the sugars to draw out the juices with the dry sugar by means of osmosis. After covering the jar with a coffee filter and leaving out for a week, the contents will evolve into a molasses-like sugary. Dilute this solution at 8mL/ gallon a nd apply. But this methods is more about extracting hormones etc than it is about nutrients, and it is done in smaller amounts than JLF.

I suggest reading up on the materials in the links i provided to help you understand the processes and reasoning behind it.
 
Julia Winter
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Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
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I've been poking around the Natural Farming Hawaii website and there are a LOT of videos.  I can't watch videos right now, but the website sure looks interesting!  On this page I found a description of how to harvest fungi from the forest - you have a box of cooked rice and either set it out in the forest, or cover it with a t-shirt and then with a layer of debris from the forest.  I think after you've got a lot of fungal action then you mix with sugar but I think I'll have to watch videos to learn more.

The idea of smell-free pig and chicken enclosures is super appealing, I'll try to watch some of these presentations soon (when I'm not at work).
 
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