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how to weave a rug with raw wool

 
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Hi I'm a weaver. Recently stared weaving rugs from raw fleece. The fleece is not washed before weaving, just lightly hand carded. Afterwards I wash the rug in a regular washing machine. This cuts out so much time! I love the finished product and hope to sell them for a decent price ... inspire more weavers to try it! I got the idea from this Irish woman on utube using fleece from the "milk sheep" up the lane ...
 
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This post is from the raising sheep only for wool conversation.  But it is such a great idea that a copy of it now starts this thread.  

Let's chat about this method.  I've seen a rug made like this and it's absolutely amazing!  

I wonder what ways we could prepare the wool for weaving like this.  Would hand cards work or is she using a drum carder.  
 
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Hi. I too watch the YT of the Irish lady using raw wool. I would love to do this and have just bought a loom to get started.

 
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Drum carding would give you nice long strips and be faster. I’m sure you could make make hand carders work and build up your arm muscles.
Great video. Thanks!
 
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I LOVE this! Thank you for rejuvenating this post!
So, this loom - is it a good guess to call it an upright, bi-heddle floor loom? It seems like a great mid- range loom to get started on...
 
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Kris schulenburg wrote:Drum carding would give you nice long strips and be faster. I’m sure you could make make hand carders work and build up your arm muscles.
Great video. Thanks!



I've seen many different ways of hand carding, most of the people say it takes a lot of work and muscle.  But when production carding, there are tricks so it takes very little muscle and is easy on the arms to card for an hour or four at a time.  These days I find drum carding harder on my arms and back than hand carding.  
 
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r ranson wrote:

I've seen many different ways of hand carding, most of the people say it takes a lot of work and muscle.  But when production carding, there are tricks so it takes very little muscle and is easy on the arms to card for an hour or four at a time.  These days I find drum carding harder on my arms and back than hand carding.  



May I enquire as to these tricks, please? I see me carding 3 goats worth of angora, in a few short months, and drums are SUBSTANTIALLY higher priced, compared to hand cards, plus my shoulders and hands are killing me.
 
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I have a snippet from my book about carding here.

The most important thing is to remember the goal.  The goal is to open and organize the fibre.  If you're doing anything that isn't that, like having the cards touch each other at ANY point during the carding, then this takes extra energy and muscles.

 
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I'm thinking about trying this, this year.

I had saved some less than awsome wool with the plan to take it the local mill for corespun yarn, but things changed, so I'm wondering what to do with these fibres that are too week to home process.  I could wash them and maybe tease them with willow switches to fluff them up, then put them in rugs?  It's an idea I'm toying with.
 
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r ranson wrote:I'm thinking about trying this, this year.

I had saved some less than awsome wool with the plan to take it the local mill for corespun yarn, but things changed, so I'm wondering what to do with these fibres that are too week to home process.  I could wash them and maybe teas them with willow switches to fluff them up, then put them in rugs?  It's an idea I'm toying with.

 
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