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Dead pasture to permaculture, where to start!?!?  RSS feed

 
Suz Clarke
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Location: New Zealand
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We have recently purchased a property in the North Island of New Zealand.

North Facing, lots of sun.
7+ hectares of over fertilized pasture, compacted by dairy farming, grazing cattle.
10 Hectares of regenerating native Bush, estimate to be approximately 100 years old (once part of an active  mining community), some pretty big rimu trees in there, smaller Kauri and others.
One 365 days of the year fresh water spring, one we do not know if 365 days of the year and another that pops up after a few days of rain.
I would love to create a farm like Zaytuna but the land is more in between Zaytuna and Sepp Holtzer in that it is steeper than the 15 degrees recommended slope for swales.
Up top where there is flat land we have very high wind, down the bottom is 'wavy' land where wild pigs sometimes turn up to dig for worms. Our bush is at the edge of more than 100 Hectares of bush which is over the river from hundreds of hectares of bush so we have wild pigs, many birds including native and introduced, rabbits, deer farm deer that have turned feral (we see their poop but not their bodies)

I need to turn the over fertilized grazing pasture into under fertilized healthy pasture in amongst food forest and garden... to feed the humans and the animals that rely on the land.

Considering the mission ahead, my reason for this post is to ask for tips on WHERE TO START?
Excited and overwhelmed. I have read many words, watched many videos but never physically completed anything even close to a task such as this!

Thank you in advance for any information, tips and constructive criticism offered.
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Miles Flansburg
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Howdy Suz, welcome to permies! Is that a picture of the pasture you are talking about? If so it looks pretty nice. You may just have to adjust your grazing practices?  Have you heard of the work of Joel Salatin ?

 
Suz Clarke
Posts: 2
Location: New Zealand
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Howdy Suz, welcome to permies! Is that a picture of the pasture you are talking about? If so it looks pretty nice. You may just have to adjust your grazing practices?  Have you heard of the work of Joel Salatin ?



That's awesome, thanks heaps!
Since moving here, that is pretty much how we move the cattle and it is daily, difference being that it is 25 cows on a total of 7.6 hectares of pasture. The are rotated over four paddocks, each paddock gets a new break created daily so that the rotate over a month before repeating.
The troughs (water) is in a permanent position so the first break in each paddock starts at the trough.
Definitely think 25 cows too many coming up to winter.
As each new break in a paddock is made they can still access the first one, necessary so they have access to the water, this means each paddock has less than a month before they come through again.
I would love to be able to manage it so that they stay in the... what did he call it 'teenage' grass stage so that the grass can bounce back faster.
I noticed that throughout the paddocks there are chunks of grass having been ripped out at the roots by the cows. The owner of the cows grazing our paddocks explained that will be from over fertilizing (the roots do not have to grow deep to find food so they are very shallow and pulled out easy) or from a kind of worm/ grub (I can't remember the term he used) that eats the roots.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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