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Dried Sweet Corn (Snack Food)  RSS feed

 
Jon Wisnoski
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Location: Zone 6b, Ontario, Canada
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Hello all,

Sometimes in my normal grain corn some of the kernels are wrinkly, with see through skin, and very chewy and delicious. They look very similar to sweet corn seeds. But sweet corn seeds are hard and brittle.
Is their some method (pick them early when you would normally for eating, or some drying method) that will produce some edible sweet corn dried snack? Or some preparation method for dried sweet corn seeds?
 
r ranson
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Carol Deppe talks about this in her book The Resilient Gardener.  Something about the different kinds of corn and which ones are best for parching.  Parching is like popping, only the corn stays more or less the original shape.  Makes for a tasty snack.

 
Jon Wisnoski
Posts: 48
Location: Zone 6b, Ontario, Canada
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raven ranson wrote:Carol Deppe talks about this in her book The Resilient Gardener.  Something about the different kinds of corn and which ones are best for parching.  Parching is like popping, only the corn stays more or less the original shape.  Makes for a tasty snack.

Ya, I have seen a few recipes for dried corn. I am sure their is lots of things you could do with dried sweet corn in particular that would taste good. I was more specifically wondering about raw dried corn. Some method it inspire the kernels to become chewy and to retain their sweetness
 
Casie Becker
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I wonder if you store them in oil (like sun dried tomatoes) if you could retain that chewiness you like.
Sundried tomatoes stored in olive oil are much softer than those that are simply dried and stored in a sealed container.

edit: On the subject of parching corn. We grew "glass gem" corn last year and it popped into delicious small kernels when fresh. However we left them in a less than air tight jar for most of a year. When we tried to pop after that hardly any kernels actually popped, but every kernel that didn't pop, parched. There wasn't a single orphan left at the bottom of the bowl and no accidentally biting down on a rock hard kernel.
 
Anne Miller
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Is the similar to the product "Corn Nuts"?

How to Make Parched Corn

Americans spend millions of dollars on pricey power bars, but Native Americans and the early pioneers already knew how to make an easy nutritious snack. Parched corn was staple of early Americans and today it is the perfect pick-me-up for any outdoor activity. Follow these steps to whip up a batch of the original American energy food.

Things You'll Need

    Corn
    Skillet
    Butter, lard, oil or cooking spray
    Spoon
    Paper towel
    Cloth or plastic bags

Dry the corn. The primary ingredient of parched corn is dried corn. To dry fresh corn on the cob, hang it in a dry area of your home and allow it to dry out naturally. Frozen corn can be dried in a dehydrator or spread on a cookie sheet and placed in an oven set at 150 degrees. Leave the oven door open a little. This method can take a few hours and the corn should be turned occasionally to prevent burning.

Oil the skillet. Add a small amount of butter, lard or oil to a skillet. Cooking spray can also be used. Heat the oil on a low temperature. Wipe the frying pan with paper towel to remove any excess oil. Only a thin coating should remain on the bottom of the pan.

Pour the corn in the skillet. Add enough dry corn to the skillet to just about cover the bottom. The actual amount will depend on the size of the skillet.

Cook the corn. Allow the corn to cook slowly. Stir the dried corn constantly to prevent burning. The parched corn is done when the kernels have swollen, and turned a medium brown. A few of the kernels may explode, just like popcorn.

Drain the corn. Pour the parched corn onto some paper towel and allow to thoroughly drain and cool. Turn the corn a couple of times to ensure that all excess oil is absorbed.

Store the parched corn. Place the parched corn in a cloth or plastic bag for storage. A small plastic bag of parched corn will be enough for your next day of hiking.

 
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