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Growing rhubarb in the south  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 1187
Location: Middle Tennessee
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My wife asked me to look into growing rhubarb. I've never grown it before, and from what I gathered researching the plant is it's a perennial, requires extended chill hours in the winter and prefers summer temperatures on the cooler more temperate side. I'm curious if anyone here who lives in the sweltering south has made an attempt at rhubarb, has had any success or perhaps knows of a variety that tolerates higher temperatures.
 
garden master
Posts: 806
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I used to know of someone in Memphis area who kept some rhubarb alive. They planted it in the flower bed underneath a window air conditioner, to use that drip, drip, drip, watering the plants. I don't have any personal experience with it.
 
Posts: 74
Location: Suburbs Salt Lake City, Utah 6a 24 in rain 58 in snow
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It grows fine here in Utah. Our summers are typically HOT...many days over 100 degrees. The plants like to be shaded from the western sun.
 
Posts: 177
Location: ALASKA
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I grew up and lived in North East Georgia all my life until 12 years ago when we moved to Alaska.  Our next door neighbor had rhubarb in her kitchen garden right outside the back door.  Had had it for many years.  Grew great there.  You should not have any problems growing it in TN.  I would probably not grow it on the south side of the house where it is in hot full sun, but maybe on the east or north side where it tends to be a little cooler.
 
Posts: 366
Location: Upstate SC
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In the deep South it tends to be short lived with Phytophthora crown rot taking them out within a few years.
 
pollinator
Posts: 759
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I can't get it to live more than a year or two. Probably root rot. I'm going to try again n a raised bed.
 
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
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There is rumored to be a variant of Victoria available from Mid-Texas that does fairly well in the hotter climates, but past about zone 8  (9 or warmer) can be difficult to keep going. I am at 6b and a raised bed and drip watering system with mulch is doing well after five years...
 
pollinator
Posts: 4339
Location: Anjou ,France
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Rhubarb started out as a Chinese medinicial herb until  British gardeners managed to grow it bigger and turned it into a fruit so I am not sure that crown rot is the issue as we get crown rot in the UK too. In the wild they grow in damp areas next to running water and don't like to get too dry .

David
 
James Freyr
gardener
Posts: 1187
Location: Middle Tennessee
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I want to thank everyone for their input! I'm gonna give it a try and see what happens.
 
Oh, sure, you could do that. Or you could eat some pie. While reading this tiny ad:
What makes you excited about rocket ovens?
https://permies.com/t/90100/excited-rocket-ovens
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