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Plant ID help

 
pollinator
Posts: 109
Location: Idaho
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It has tiny thorns on the stem. It is growing under a large for tree. There are a lot of these plants
IMG_4277.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_4277.JPG]
 
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Hi Dan! This almost looks like Salmonberry based on your Northwest location - Rubus spectabilis which is a NW native you may be familiar with. Otherwise I'd venture it's a member of the Rubus (raspberry/blackberry) Genus. Do you have any other guesses?
 
Dan Ohmann
pollinator
Posts: 109
Location: Idaho
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Thank you Pete.  Rubus spectabilis looks like a winner!  I asked a friend who lives nearby and he said it was some kind of bramble berry.  
 
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Definitely Rubus....enjoy dem berries!

You wont get any this year of course, but allow the stalks to grow and next year they will branch out and you will get berries. I always cut the canes just in time so the tips do not touch the ground and root or they will take over the whole area.
 
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