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Let's conjure up some recipes utilizing dried kelp granules or powder  RSS feed

 
Thekla McDaniels
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I have tried eating a teaspoon a day of dried kelp. It is not much fun to eat, and yet it is a rich source of unrefined minerals, minerals we all need.   I have seen my goats bloom and flourish from eating as much kelp as they want.  They get more color in the coats, and those coats slick off and absolutely shine... so, I try to eat kelp, but have not found a way to enjoy it yet.  Consequently I often "forget" about it for months at a time.

Today I found and tried a very expensive kelp snack flavored with sesame rosemary olive oil and salt.  It was delicious, but I don't think there was a teaspoon's worth of kelp in the whole package.

It got me thinking about using that dried kelp to make something I like.  Sesame, garlic, salt, cheese and kelp, I think I would like those flavors together.  Maybe I could add kelp to a cheese straw recipe, or scones, or crackers?  Maybe add it to the next loaf of kefir leavened(https://permies.com/t/66185/kitchen/Kefir-Bread-Recipes#562930)  vollkornbrot (https://permies.com/t/66366/vollkornbrot), I just started the rye soaking. It will be ready to bake in about 5 days.

But maybe there are some people who are way ahead of me. People who have some good recipes, and know some guidelines for how much kelp to give it flavor but not overpower the other flavors.

If there are no existing recipes,  could we share our experiments and learn together.
 
Anne Miller
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Have you tried adding it to other foods?  Such as adding to salad dressing to pour over a salad or adding to soup?  Maybe it needs to be heated in boiling water to make it blend?  "Heat water in a large pot over low heat. Add kombu (dried kelp) and cook until the mixture just begins to simmer."
 
Thekla McDaniels
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making a more flavorful broth,probably cutting back on the salt.  I'll give it a test first,but it seems like I could add it to the bone and chicken broth I can every fall and winter.  It is kind of a nutrient dense "tonic" thing.  Kelp would be a great place for a super food like my broth.Thanks

 
Anne Miller
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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I would like to hear of more folks using kelp.  I have thought to buy it many times as it is good for helping with canine dental issues.  It sounds to me like a super food that should be in more diets.

With all the health conscience folks here on permies I would think this would be something many folks use.  I have heard of using seaweed in gardens but not many talking about eating it.

 
Thekla McDaniels
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I tried some kelp in the scrambled eggs a few days back.  onions sauteed in butter, poured in the scrambled eggs with kelp added, then put some cheese on/in and let the eggs cook without stirring (it just makes such a mess of the cheese).

The result was not offensive.  The kelp brings enough flavor with it, it needs (IMO) a complement or two ("you're looking nice today").  The texture of the kelp is firm enough that it does not vanish,nor contribute.  In something with chopped nut texture, the kelp texture would not stand out.

I was OK,but not something I would take to a potluck to inspire folks with healthy options.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Chevre with kelp, sesame, salt and cayenne.


I started with 6 oz of fresh chevre, added 2 T kelp and 2 T fresh toasted and ground sesame and 1/4 t Salt. 

Results are kind of nondescript, but it really needs time for the flavors to combine.  I think it will need garlic.

I made a log,and I made balls rolled in more sesame meal.  Additional salt in the sesame meal before rolling the cheese balls was good. 

I mixed some turmeric into some and it was not interesting,

I added a sprinkle of ground cayenne to the sesame meal for rolling and that was an improvement.

Interesting to note:  though I say they were "sort of OK" I ate quite a few. 

At this point I need to let it set over night before I try anything else.

They are better that the "not offensive" rating of the scrambled eggs.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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FYI, the kelp and sesame cheese balls are not what I would consider a success.
 
Anne Miller
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Since I had been contemplating buying kelp, this thread has giving me the opportunity to investigate how to use it.  On allrecipes.com it says that kelp, also known as dashi is the basis of Japanese cooking.  It is also used in Korean cooking.  In Japanese cooking it is used in Miso Soup.

On WikiHow there is an article on "How to cook Seaweed"; it says " Add kelp to simmered dishes. Kelp is most often used in dashi." 

At http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,kelp_powder,FF.html:

There are several suggestions on how to use kelp powder.  I assume if you have granules you could soak them first in some boiling water if you feel that needs to be done.  Here are some recipes suggestion  from that link:

Whole grain bread, cornbread, burritos,  stuffed cabbage,  salad dressing, seasoning salt, and others.

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/not-tuna-salad  uses the granules for a "tuna" salad made with garbanzo beans..



 
Thekla McDaniels
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Thanks, Anne.
 
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