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Let her brood, now she's too weak to stand...  RSS feed

 
William Bronson
Posts: 1540
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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I need advice.
One of my hens went broody. After freaking out, I read up on it and decided to let it pass in due time.
I saw her get up to eat and drink,so i figured she was good.
Fast forward, I'm thinking "dang that when is still broody? Seems like more than 21 days.Ah well, what do i know..."
Next day, I hear the sound if a chook being harrased in the coop.
We are working on bring out her protective herding instincts,with mixed results.
She likes to chase them, but she hasnt laid a tooth on one yet.
Still, no dogs in the coop is our rule,so I call her out chastise and dominate her,and go to check on the chickens.
My brood when is lying there,looking broken.
I check,not a scratch on her,but when I put her diwn, she falls flat on her face.
I check again and she is crazy thin and light!

My wife and I are able to get her to eat a little and drink some as well,but she seems blind,and still unable to get to her feet when I left his morning.

I curse myself as a fool,thinking she was fine on her own.
I broke my no chickens in the house rule so she could rest in air conditioned comfort,but i fear she wont recover

Any advice on feed and hydration is welcome.
They have not been on layers rations in a while, just scraps and forage and which is probably why she couldn't stay fit- she wasn't foraging,being broody and all.

They all will be getting back on the storebought feed,but what would be best for her?

So far I have given her a broth of bread and fat,with comfrey ,mulberry and grape leaves.

She is popping,a little,which I take as a good sign.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
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time for electrolites and proper nutrition. a broody hen needs availability to good nutrition during the sit along with plenty of fresh water.
Put some electrolites in her waterer along with a little apple cider vinegar with mother. That will help her recover if she can.

If you haven't checked this thread out, please do so Broody hen management

Redhawk
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1540
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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Thank you for the advice. Are there special electrolytes for livestock or are we talking Gatorade?

As for the thread, it confirms my suspicion that lazy egg gathering on our part triggered her,and gives me a relatively benign way of breaking a hen out if it.
Thanks again for your help.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
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Yes they are special electrolites you should be able to get them at your feed store or farm supply store.

These will help your hen get some of her strength back by boosting her water content and provide some needed minerals.

While our hens always get some layer feed (it is in the coop along with a waterer), they mostly free forage.
When one goes broody I make sure to add some ACV with mother to the waterer she uses along with some chick starter (has higher protein content) to her feed rations.
That way she doesn't miss out on nutrition when she does eat, the vinegar water helps keep her hydrated and her gut working well.
We also have a free choice feeder that has Sea-90 in it (95 mineral salts) they won't always go to it but it is there should they want some.

Mostly you just have to keep an eye on a broody, usually they do a fair job of taking care of themselves.

Redhawk
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1540
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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My chook is much stronger.
She is on the verge of standing up on her own.

The problem is she is mostly blind.
She can't seem to feed herself. We feed her twice a day or more, but it doesn't seem to be enough,and it's getting old.
My reading points toward worms or disease,but I'm too ignorant to tell what's up.
Shed not a pet, but she isn't fit to live as a normal chicken.
I'm considering how to kill her.
An unmarked corpse would be easier on the kids than lopping off her head-we never intended to harvest these chooks, but hoped to see them die of old age.
 
Justyn Mavis
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Location: FEMA District III
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Personally I wouldn't kill her just let her die peacefully. I would give her treats on a regular basis. Death is an important lesson for the children, and for you.

What I normally do is make a separate enclosure for end of life. Sometimes if it's a nice day I may find a quite spot under a tree with a nice view, or nice feeling. I make a good nest and let them chill out in that spot all day giving them access to clean water, and yummy foods.

If you think she is healthy enough to save. 1.) lots of Fresh dandelions. Root, and leaves.  2.) apple cider vinegar.  3.) Fresh Fruit. something she can pick at. 4.) worms. 5.) egg yokes (and maybe some warm oatmeal mixed in) 6.) Good Juju. That's handling you chicken and give her some good source energy. 7.) Thank her for her service and understand each life force has to move it it's next stage or cycle.

I've had a few chickens get very light and recover over a few week period of time, and then I have then died within a few day.

One of my favorite chickens. (The Cock that started my current flock) a pound rescue; is on year 7, and he is starting to show his age. Still dirt bath, but is very skinny and is hanging out in the box a lot. He will be missed when he's gone. But, I do give him as much attention as possible. and some extra treats.

Good Luck my friend. May your chook recover quickly or pass along peacefully.

-Justyn
  
 
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