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!!!!!!!!!!!!! SEPP to Boot: Stephen's Experience (BRK)

 
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How would those panels be used?  Surround the class with them to make the heated space smaller?  Seem like they'd use up a lot of materials and be a challenge to store.  Thick tarps/blankets might have a tolerable R value and fold up when not needed...

I suspect that if a temporary ceiling could be put at 8-12' off the ground, it would hold a lot of heat down where the people are.  Then you'd still have the full footprint of the auditorium for food, tables and spreading out.  But there would be the complications of lights and other stuff that would then be above the ceiling.
 
gardener
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Suggestions requested: after my almost-two years of splitting wood here, more and more bark has piled-up at the furthest-back cell of the Berm Shed. We'd burn it for firewood, but it's smoky and expands in the wood feeds. Personally, I'm drained (from all the wood-splitting lately, I guess) and not very forthcoming with novel ideas on how to use spare bark. Any suggestions on what to do with this stuff?



I would use it as mulch.  To make it easier to move, I would lay down a tarp, take the drier stuff and put it on the tarp, stomp all over it to break it up then spread it where you want mulch.

OMG...love the soup bowls and soup!
 
pollinator
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Mike Haasl wrote:How would those panels be used?  Surround the class with them to make the heated space smaller?  Seem like they'd use up a lot of materials and be a challenge to store.  Thick tarps/blankets might have a tolerable R value and fold up when not needed...


I like your idea of using fabric of some kind, and yeah it would be much more store-able and with added utility beyond that. I will be heading into town to find some blanket-y stuff tomorrow, so I will look into the feasibility of a fabric solution. As it happens, Paul and I had a discussion about this and it seems it's moved further down the priority list for the time being. Also, I like the idea of lowering the ceiling (and even having a loft-like second floor up there) but that would be a major undertaking. Again, not something at the top of the list right now.
 
Stephen B. Thomas
pollinator
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Tina Wolf wrote:I would use it as mulch.  To make it easier to move, I would lay down a tarp, take the drier stuff and put it on the tarp, stomp all over it to break it up then spread it where you want mulch.


I think the ground around the WilloWonka (the willow feeder in Arrakis, behind the Classroom) could use a bit of this mulch of which you speak... It's tempting, for sure.
 
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Stephen B. Thomas wrote:I like your idea of using fabric of some kind, and yeah it would be much more store-able and with added utility beyond that. I will be heading into town to find some blanket-y stuff tomorrow, so I will look into the feasibility of a fabric solution.


I was just talking with Richard from CampingYurts (out of Oregon) and he claims the bottom has dropped from the market for wool, herders can't give it away. Not sure if that is a local phenomenon, but I've recently found a place (Arcturus) selling queen size blankets of 100% virgin wool brand new for $90 and got a few of those. Even tested one with a cig lighter to confirm it is not a synthetic blend. It is difficult to pass up the $15 thrift store quilt, but since this will be at Wheaton Labs in a place prominent to visitors, a little extra expense to avoid synthetics doesn't seem outrageous...
 
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