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Espoma

 
                                
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Does anyone care to comment on Espoma Organic Lawn Food 18-8-6 relative to Lawn Restore?  In my area Espoma is more available.  Both claim to be mostly insoluble in water, lows salts, non burning, etc.  The Espoma is more nutrient dense and is comparable in price.  Here's a link http://www.espoma.com/content.aspx?type=p&id=20&intCategoryID=3.

Regards, Scott
 
paul wheaton
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Posts: 20423
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
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Do they have a web site?

Or, can you attach a pic of their bag where it talks about the contents?
 
John Meshna
Posts: 111
Location: Vermont
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The problem with that fertilizer is the super triple phosphate.  It has been found that iron, zinc and manganese are tied up by phosphate and you soon develop yellowing in the plants and reduced vigor and even death if the problem continues long enough.
that much synthetic phosphate and that much phosphate in general is never necessary.  It's a throw back to the times of maximum profit at any cost.  you do see good results for a short time but then the problems start showing up.  One false solution often proffered is to add nitrogen as yellowing is often a sign of not enough nitrogen.  then you get excessive weed growth so then you get a recommendation for herbicides which further toxify the soil and weeken the plants even more and that usually leads to some kind of bug infestation which leads to people spraying pesticides and I think you can guess the rest.  It's an endless cycle downward and it's where modern agriculture is today is so many ways.

So, my recommendation is to stay away from that fertilizer altogether.  Low phosphate fertilizers with lower numbers for nitrogen and more micriobial additives and humates are the way to go. 
Additions of compost are good too, whenever the resource is available but don't over due that either.  Slow changes, do no harm and patience are your best recipe.
 
                                
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Thank you dirtworks.  So Ringer's Lawn Restore is more like what you'd prefer?

Regards, Scott
 
John Meshna
Posts: 111
Location: Vermont
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I've never used ringer fertilizer.  I prefer the stuff that I sell.  JM
 
                                
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Sorry Dirtworks if I offended.  I didn't realize you sold lawn care products.  I will peruse your site.  In the meantime, based on your comments concerning the Espoma 18-8-6, I did discover that they also sell this 7-2-2 product - http://www.espoma.com/content.aspx?type=p&id=49&intCategoryID=3.  It's organic, has lower nutrient density, microbe enhanced, etc.  Care to comment on this one too?

Regards, Scott
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
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