paul has a new video  

 



visit the thread.

see the DVDs.

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Re-curing poorly-cured bacon after it's been sliced and frozen?  RSS feed

 
M Johnson
Posts: 128
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried a new butcher and the cure they did on the bacon is not great at all.  They were very short on the time it took which gave me a red flag at first, but my normal butcher wasn't available.

Anything I can do to continue/change the cure?  It is already sliced and frozen.
Thanks.
 
Jim Fry
Posts: 146
Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
13
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You write that your usual butcher "wasn't" available. Does that imply that the regular is now available? If so, take in a sample and ask him. We can suggest things to do, but, we can't see or smell the poorly cured meat. Poorly cured or preserved meats (or other foods like beans) can be iffy (even deadly). Remote advice would seem to be less safe than on site advice. If I suggest what to do and you get sick, that's on me. And I'm not that interested in you getting sick.
 
Deb Rebel
gardener
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
189
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can you return it because it is unsafe? You were sold a defective product (not cured properly). If not I also suggest you take some to your regular butcher and get their advice.
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6792
Location: Left Coast Canada
857
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bacon is cured by exposing it to sugar, salt and sometimes nitrites and spices.  The nitrites reduce the amount of salt and time needed to cure the bacon and a thin slab can cure in a handful of days.  After which, the bacon is smoked and then heated to an internal temp of 140F (-ish  I think it needs to be over 138 for cured meats, but 140's a safe mark so that's what I do).  So basically, bacon is cooked meat.  I don't think it can be re-cured.

In the past, the goal of baconing meat was to help it keep at room temperature for months or years.  This required a lot more salt than what we use now and quite often, the pork would have to be soaked in water to remove the salt prior to cooking.  There were also kinds of bacon that didn't need cooking after curing.  Being thin, it could hang to dry. 

With modern day refrigeration, we now bacon meat more for flavour than for shelf life.  Thus less salt and more cooking.


What concerns you most about your bacon?  The look?  Flavour? 

If it's flavour and you aren't happy with it.  That's as good a reason as any to take it back. 
As to changing the cure on finished bacon - that would be tricky.  Perhaps finding recipes to use it in that cook it really well would be a good use for the bacon?  Fry it then put it in soups?
It would be easier to make your own (which is super-easy).  make your own bacon at home.
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 3143
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
254
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
poorly cured bacon is a no save item. You can not re-cure bacon. You can however re-work it into a sausage product which would have additions of spices to offset that bad cure.

Redhawk
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!