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dehydrating greens to make powders to add to baking and noodle making  RSS feed

 
Posts: 149
Location: Massachusetts
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I am interested in making my own  , vegetable powders for noodle makeing breads  and soups . powdered kale and spinach are pricey
I have vast amounts of grape leaf and egyption onion and have planted Kale and chard

.
would love input 


Sue 
 
pollinator
Posts: 1984
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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I also am interested in this process.
My research indicates that the nutrients in greens are best preserved when dried out of direct sunlight.
I have fed my green vegetable hating daughter pancakes made  fresh kale, enough to tint the batter.
She loved it,but that's because she didn't know what was in them!
 
pollinator
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Location: Anjou ,France
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This seems lots of efforts since by planting different members of the cabbage family you can have them all the year round   also I since green plants use sunlight I think that makes them more susceptible to damage if dried in the sun . The onions I am going to try myself along with attempts to make my own dried soup

David
 
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Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
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A year or so ago I read that papaya leaves were the power house of micro nutrients that kale and spinach are so I started cutting the younger leaves and simply putting them on some aluminum foil... Then put it near the AC unit and move it to the stove after I cook something but while its still warm to get dryer. Then I crumble the leaves and remove the veiny parts and grind the leaf flakes in my mortar an pestle thingy... It makes a fine powder. I just put it in capsules and take a few daily... This time of year I only cook once or twice a week to avoid heating up the house.... Later in the year, when its not 95* out, I put it on the wood stove over a low fire to dry. That technique should work for any greens....
 
gardener
Posts: 7497
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Most of my vegetable and herb drying has been done in vehicles. A car parked in the sun, gets quite warm. Crack the windows open and you have a solar dryer.

Most things can be powdered up in the blender. For small amounts and to get a really nice even grind, a coffee grinder works pretty well. I like to put the dry leaves in a brown paper bag and scrunch them up first. This reduces the volume so that each batch entering the grinder, is larger.

Once processed in this way, the powder can be put in jars and either put in the cupboard or frozen.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1984
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I haven't had much luck with cabbage,but I get green onions year round.
I hate dolma,but I'm hoping to dry grape leaves or use them as potherbs,as I certainly have enough of them.
Right now, the rabbits eat them, but there are plenty of other things they can eat and I cant.

Drying might deal with a common issue among wild harvested leaf crops. Most are said to be good "when young" ,but get "too tough" to palatable,as they age.

Wet heat (stewing,canning), acid(pickling) ,fermentation(again,pickling), mechanized mastication (juicing,smoothies) or dry heat(dehydration) can all contribute to making rough foods edible.
 
Susan Doyon
Posts: 149
Location: Massachusetts
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I got interested at first because I am learning to make Konjac Glucomannan flour noodles , ( I am on a weight loss journey 18 lbs lost  and still 88 lbs from where I want to end up )  and I do not care for the texture plain so I have ordered oat bran to mix in  . I started thinking what else could I add to make soups and noodles more nutrient and fiber dense while staying low calorie  . kale powder is pricey but I have acres with loads of wild grape and there are things I do not care for as a pot herb that I would be fine with dried and ground as part of a noodle flour
   grape leaves have a bit much chew to use like spinach   but high fiber , vitamin A vitamin K and potassium     http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/3038/2

then I also have 44 acers of woodlands and meadow and a garden that was fallow last year that is full of purslane , lambs quarters chickweed  and nettles  I do not really care for these as a pot herb but I thought in a powdered mix I could use in cooking .
The green onions I have 2 rows of  and I already freeze lots but I do not want to add a second freezer


Sue
 
Posts: 40
Location: Eau Claire, WI
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I started saving greens two summers ago when I bought a square dehydrator. Lots of good suggestions already posted for how to dry them. In the Excalibur, place on trays at the lowest possible heat setting.

My dried greens go into smoothies and dog biscuits along with hemp hearts for omega 3s.
 
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