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Recipes for Using a Bread Machine using Flour Substitutes (Gluten Free)

 
master steward
Posts: 4037
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1206
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I am doing some experiments using the bread machine because I don't heat up the house with the oven during the summer.

I am looking to use cooked beans (bean flour), mashed potatoes (potato flour), cooked rice or rice flour and cornmeal as substitutes for wheat flour. Maybe even using buckwheat, if I can find it.

Does anyone has recipes that you use with these ingredients?  I would like not to use Xanthan gun or guar gum if possible.

Looking for bread, quick bread or cake recipes to experiment with.  Please post your and I will be posting results and recipes here, too.

If you have a non-bread machine recipe, you can post it and maybe I can adapt it to the BM.

Here are some threads I found helpful:

https://permies.com/t/54060/kitchen/guar-gum-xanthan-gum-gluten

Suggested using chia seeds or psyllium husks

https://permies.com/t/3098/kitchen/corn-meal-corn-dogs

this is a common practice in my kitchen:  Soaking any kind of flour overnight with whatever moistener your recipe calls for generally helps soften up the individual flour particles because the flour has had time to absorb the water more fully.  It'll usually hold together much better after a soak.
 
Anne Miller
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Here is a list I found:

Look for gluten-free products in specialty aisles of your regular grocery store, at natural foods stores or from producers like Bob’s Red Mill.

Essential Ingredient: Xanathan Gum — A thickener and stabilizer made from fermented corn sugar, xanthan gum gives dough elasticity or stickiness, a property that gluten usually provides.


Gluten-Free Flours:

Arrowroot Flour — This starchy flour, made by drying and grinding the roots of a tropical tuber, has twice the thickening power of wheat flour and is completely tasteless. It is most often used to thicken sauces and puddings, but can also be used in baked goods. Look for it in supermarkets, health food stores and Asian markets.

Buckwheat Flour — Buckwheat is not actually a type of wheat, but a member of the herb family. The seeds are ground to make a strong-flavored gluten-free flour that is most often used in pancakes.

Cornmeal — Made by grinding dried corn kernels, cornmeal can be fine-, medium- or coarse-textured. Water-ground or stone-ground types are more nutritious than steel-ground, since more of the corn kernel is retained.

Fava Bean Flour — The tough skin of these beans is removed and the dried bean is milled, producing fine flour that is often used for gluten-free cooking and baking.

Flax Seed Meal — Ground flax seed can pump up the nutritional content of starchy gluten-free baked goods, with calcium, iron, vitamin E and Omega-3 fatty acids. When mixed with water, it develops a texture resembling egg whites and is sometimes used as an egg substitute.

Garbanzo Bean Flour — Traditionally used in Indian cooking, this flour has a rich sweet flavor when used in baked goods. It is often mixed with fava bean flour.

Potato Flour — Made from cooked, dried and ground potatoes, this flour is most often used as a thickener but can also be used for baking.

Rice Flour — Neutral-flavored rice flour is one of the most common substitutes for regular wheat flour. Both white and brown rice can be made into flour, but the outer husk is always removed before grinding.

In the past, I have substituted cooked mashed beans and cooked rice (from congee) with great success.  I believe I can successfully use cooked mash potatoes or instant potato flakes.

This maybe the first recipe that I will try; substituting one or more of the above for the gluten-free multi-purpose flour  :

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread

   1 cup pumpkin puree
   3/4 cup white sugar
   2 eggs, beaten
   1/4 cup canola oil
   1/4 cup applesauce
   1 3/4 cups gluten-free multi-purpose flour
   1 teaspoon baking soda
   3/4 teaspoon salt
   1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
   1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
   1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
   1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
   1/4 cup raisins
 
Directions

Add ingredients based on your bread machine and bake on the quick cycle.

 
Posts: 38
Location: Udon Thani, Thailand
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I would avoid the pre-mixed gluten free flours, unless you need to increase your chemical intake.

My wife and I have tried a number of grain-free recipes, as my stomach doesn't like starch. All were pretty awful unfortunately. I will have the occasional wrap, but still suffer afterwards.

Good luck and I hope you do manage to find some good recipes.
 
Anne Miller
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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I have been working on the vegetable garden and haven't had time to experiment with the bread machine yet.  

I don't want to buy any of the expensive gluten free mixes instead I want to use cornmeal, cooked beans, cooked rice, or mashed potatoes.  As I thought buckwheat flour was not available.

I am also thinking that my problems may be related to products made with yeast which I have not researched yet.

This is the recipe that inspired this thread.  I think if I doubled it and used the quick bread cycle it might work:

mary jayne richmond wrote:update.... my bean cornbread adventure...   i was trying to make a "bread" of some sort that i could grow all of the ingredients  well i think with the help of veryone on this post i've been able to do just that,  so here's the recipe i used and i was very happy with how it turned out it was a bit more crumbly than my flour version.   1 cup corn meal... 1 cup of cooked drained beans...1/3 cup of maple syrup...1/2 teaspoon salt... 3 teaspoons of baking powder.... 1 egg...  1/4 cup shortening melted... in a bowl i put the cornmeal, salt and baking powder... then i put the beans,maple syrup,egg. and melted shortening in the blender until i had a smooth batter... then mixed them together, and baked it at 400 degrees for about 25 min.    grease the pan your going to put it in.   so, cornmeal, beans, maple syrup, egg, and shortening {read rendered lamb fat } all came off the farm. only the baking powder and the salt were bought.   very happy with the out come,  thanks everyone for the suggestions



https://permies.com/t/60355/kitchen/Poison-dry-pulses-people-raw
 
Anne Miller
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This recipe might be doubled and made suitable for the bread machine.

Italian Chickpea Bread

   1 cup chickpea flour
   1 cup water
   cooking spray
   2 tablespoons oil
   1 1/2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
   1 1/2 teaspoons chopped dried rosemary
   ground black pepper to taste
   1 pinch salt to taste (optional)

   Directions    

   Whisk chickpea flour and water together in a bowl until smooth; let sit at room temperature, 2 to 6 hours.

   Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Spray the inside of an 8-inch metal pie pan.

   Skim foam from the top of chickpea-water mixture. Add oil, Italian seasoning, and rosemary and stir until combined. Pour mixture into the prepared pan; sprinkle black pepper and salt over the top.

   Bake in the preheated oven until edges begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove bread from pan and cut into wedges.

Cook's Notes:  Use a metal pie pan; a glass or ceramic one may break with the extremely high temperature!  Chickpea flour is also known as garbanzo bean flour.

 
pollinator
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Location: Anjou ,France
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Buckwheat is quite big here in France and is a mainstay of Breton Cooking . The pancakes are not like the sweet crepe but the savory galette. You can  buy bread made with it too but it's not that popular because of the strong taste . It grows well on poor soils have you thought of growing your own ?
 
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