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Homemade dog food and increased flies on poop  RSS feed

 
Stacy Witscher
Posts: 87
Location: SF Bay Area
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So, I've cut back on commercial dog food, and am supplementing with food waste, but I've noticed that the flies on my one dog's poop have become extreme, and after a few hours his poop looks crumbled. At first, I thought great, it's breaking down quickly, but I'm not so sure. Any thoughts? By the way, I live in the suburbs.
 
Joshua Parke
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Location: Northern New Mexico, Latitude:35 degrees N, Elevation:6000'
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Food waste?? as in table scraps?  Or the trimmed scraps that goes to the compost?  It's only happening on one of your dogs poop?  Maybe your dog is letting go of backed up gunk from their GI tract that the flies are very attracted to.  When the GI begins to detox it'll let go of some foul stuff.  Maybe that's what's going on.?? I really don't know.  And the crumbling after a few hours, again I don't know but maybe it's from lack of hydration in the poop, which again makes me wonder if the GI tract is doing some self cleaning now that you've cut back on the commercial dog food and began supplementing with waste.  "I'm assuming that when you say waste, you're talking about all the stuff that gets trimmed and taken to the compost."  Which again is probably helping cleanse your dogs GI tract, especially considering that all those scraps are likely raw/uncooked.

I feed my dog raw foods, and his poop does break down quicker than dogs that eat kibble.
 
Stacy Witscher
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Location: SF Bay Area
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Thanks for the reply. The poop isn't overly dry, it just doesn't hold together after a few hours.

Food waste, as in trimmings, for the most part. I recently had a hog delivery, so bones, bits of meat and cartilage, top and tails of green beans, cooked winter squash/yams, eggs, whey.

I tried looking online, but everything that I found was very mainstream, pick up poop immediately, spray with poisons, etc.

The only other info I found was on a sled dogs message board, that suggested sprinkling poop with lime to cut down on the flies.

It is only one of my dogs, and I'm not sure why.
 
Cody DeBaun
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Location: Denton, TX United States Zone 8a
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Crumbly could be from more bones in the diet. When my two dogs transitioned off of the factory stuff I had a similar experience: one had no issues, the other had constipation, diarrhea and some really stinky droppings. After a while it balanced out and wasn't a problem. Here are some more specific thoughts, though:

- puppy probiotics. Helped to get over the hump in adjusting to a different food. Feed a creature the exact same thing every day for years, and it may take some time to get used to variety. I think half the reason my one dog had no issues is that he's a weird piglet-dog; he'll graze on grass, eat insects, mushrooms, roots you name it. He was already kind of used to the variety.

- Separate RMB's (raw meaty bones) and other foods. Mine get raw meaty bones one meal, and a mix of other things for the other meal (veggies, oatmeal, ground beef, eggs, herbs, fish, fruit, etc etc). Then I find they usually have one chalky white poop and one smelly brown/green poop. They seem to be happier and more healthy this way.

- uncooked greens can be really hard on dog's stomachs. They weren't really made for processing much of that. cook them for a while, maybe soak in vinegar or even just smash them up really good (macerate), and it might help them digest those garden scraps a bit better.

- Watch fat to protein ration: when I first started making something up for the dogs, it had WAY too much fat. Lead to bad things. When I eased up on the fish, animal fat, eggs, and other high-fat sources it helped.

- I've read some dogs have trouble with whey. That could be a contributing factor.

- I dunno what lime would do. A little DE might do well though, desiccate it and bother those little fly feet.
 
Stacy Witscher
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Location: SF Bay Area
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Thank you. I will try one meal bones, one other stuff. I am aware that too much fat can be an issue, but the increased fat is helping with skin problems. My two large dogs have lost weight and the little one has gained. I feel like everything is all over the place.

I will try sprinkling his poop with DE, I have plenty. Just to be clear, the forum was talking about agricultural lime, not fruit juice. I assumed the pH change wouldn't be liked by the flies, but I don't know. But, I'll try the DE first.
 
Rebecca Norman
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I heard a Taiwanese permaculture teacher say that he keeps a small worm-bin half sunk in the ground, and pooper-scoops his dog's poop into it, and the compost worms make short work of it. I think it was just a garbage bin, with holes in the earth-covered bottom part for the worms and other organisms to come and go in the ground. It had a lid to keep rain out, smells in, and to keep flies from going in and laying eggs. I think he said he's had it in one spot for years and never needs to empty it or move it, but I'm not sure I remember that correctly.
 
She still doesn't approve of my superhero lifestyle. Or this shameless plug:
21 podcast review of Sepp Holzer's Permaculture
https://permies.com/wiki/54445/digital-market/digital-market/podcast-review-Sepp-Holzer-Permaculture
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