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spinning question...advice for better long draw?  RSS feed

 
Judith Browning
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I'm finally spinning again and am trying to work on my long draw.  I just can't seem to avoid very very thin spots.  I know I need practice but I'm going to run out of this wonderful lambs wool and don't have another jacob sheep lined up for wool yet.  I think my carding is not quite as perfect as could be and that is part of the problem, I hit a slubby,thicker place that doesn't draw as nicely.

Any advice? 

I think my tension and treadling are OK...the yarn is pulling onto the bobbin fine and I can treadle fairly evenly and slow enough.  I just keep drawing out to 'too thin' almost at regular intervals.  The yarn I'm trying for is fairly thin anyway...I don't remember gauges for wool but fine enough to crochet loosely with a size I (5.50mm) crochet hook.

I'm dizzing off of my cards to about three foot roving.  I like the way that spins rather than a rolag made on the cards

This is my summer project in our workroom with the AC...gets me motivated to do something in there since that's the only cool room in the house.

I did ply some and that really solved the problem as it evened out the thinner spots but I'd like to learn to control a one ply and leave it at that.

thanks....
 
r ranson
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For me, it's very much about the fibre prep.  Maybe 85% fibre prep, 10% skill, 5% star alinement.  It depends a lot on the spinner and the fibre.  Finding what works for you for this fibre might take a bit of experimenting. 

Most fibres, I like to have them less organised when spinning woollen.  A rolag, puni, or off the side (not end) of a batt works well. What the heck is a rolag, puni and batt?   

Basically, any prep where the fibre is almost perpendicular to the yarn, works well for me.  If the fibres are organised in the same direction as the yarn, I find it makes a less even long draw.   Like in this video, she's spinning commercial top from the fold. 



double drafting helps to create an even yarn.  We get our yarn started, then pinch near the fibre source, and as the twist builds in the yarn, pull back on the yarn.  The twist will gather in the narrow spots allowing the thicker bits to grow thinner.


 
Judith Browning
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Thank you so much R.... I've seen the first video you've posted and not the second...need to watch both.

I think I needed reaffirmation that it's my carding skills...I'm a little lazy there and know I could do better

Maybe I should try some rolls/rolags on the cards as I used to do (that was when I was going for some much thicker yarns...haven't tried that with this thinner yarn).

You've give me some places to focus anyway....especially better prep work 
 
r ranson
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Every fibre is different.  I know I keep saying that, but it's worth repeating.  Try as many ways as you can and let us know what works. 
 
Judith Browning
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r ranson wrote:Every fibre is different.  I know I keep saying that, but it's worth repeating.  Try as many ways as you can and let us know what works. 


I agree...my recent experience is only with this jacob's wool from young sheep...I think some of my issues here go back to skirting and sorting after shearing.  I thought I skirted ok but did not sort well at all...so there are some second cuts and various textures of wool all mixed together.  I've just been carding it all together and have some 'pills' to try to pick out...might be I'm loading the cards with too much wool also, I try to use less and then catch myself with too much on them....thinking out loud here...thanks again...your yarn is incentive to keep trying
 
Jim Fry
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Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
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Not exactly on point, but,... Different sheep breeds of course produce differing "wools". But even within a single breed the wool can vary quite a bit. A friend of ours raises Jacobs. He never gives them grain, and his pasture isn't particularly great. We give our Jacobs some grain and have plentiful pasture. Our sheep's wool is much better. We sold some the other day to a lady who always spins/weaves with Jacob's. She was very pleased. We also find/use the best ram we can find for breeding. Just like any other farming practice, using the best seed or breed, and good fertilizing/feeding practices, and good housing/soil will produce the best end result. Folks that skimp on farming practices are practicing a false economy. ---The point being, knowing how the wool is produced and using the best wool available/possible will help make your spinning easier, and produce a much better end product. 
 
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