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Is my coppa going bad?  RSS feed

 
Bernie Ross
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Hi.   I'm a beginner at this, having cured a guanciale (pork) cheek, with success, now trying a coppa (pork shoulder). 

I've read that while white mould is OK during the drying process,  black mould isn't, and you should chuck it. 

I have some whitish mould spots, some blue/grey, and some dark brown/black.    It's been drying for 15 days, and has lost around 22% of its original weight.

Photo attached.    Do I have to throw it away?  Or is this OK ?

Thanks!

- Bernie
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r ranson
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White mould is expected and encouraged.  Not sure about the blue stuff.  Black definitely bad. 

How does it smell?
 
Bernie Ross
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Yup.  That's what I've heard.    It smells fine.    The black bits are small spots - quite a few of them.

I've given it a wash in vinegar and will see how things develop.    I'll finish the drying process and get someone with a better nose than me to give it a good smell before trying it.    I think if it's gone bad, it will be obvious - unless someone more knowledgeable than me tells me otherwise. 

- Bernie
 
Jason Learned
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Maybe try washing it with brine? They do that with cheese.

Good luck,

Jason

 
Irene Kightley
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It looks very damp to me.

To save it, I'd wash it in vinegar the rub some alcohol over it, scraping the mould off with your fingernail or a knife, more alcohol then pepper it to absorb as much moisture as possible, rub the pepper in well into all the bumps and open areas.

Hang it somewhere dry but open to moving air and if that place becomes humid, move the copa. Keep your eye on it all the time.

This is one of ours, notice how much pepper there is and how the string is pulled really tight to keep the copa solid.

It's a shame to waste it, but don't hesitate to get rid of it if black mould takes over. Good luck.

 
Bryant RedHawk
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are you trying to air dry it or did you salt it first? Where I live I can't get temps down low enough for air curing only, I have to salt cure.

air dry curing needs temps in the low 40's to work correctly.

 
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