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Who wants a cheap house? Brand new Quonset hut for sale -- would be a great starter home!  RSS feed

 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
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Please note: I have posted this in the building forum as well, but I wasn't sure that was the right place. If it is illegal to post duplicates and one of these is not where it should be, I apologize and ask if someone who has authority to do so would delete whichever is the worst offender. Thanks!


So ... you need a house (or shed, shop, studio, etc.) and don't have much money? Have I got a bargain for you ...

We really goofed (this is not a commercial pitch, I promise), and bought an incredibly nice, strong, well-made steel S-Model quonset hut back in March of this year. After we got it, we decided that we got way ahead of ourselves, and really ought to have put the money into finishing our new house before putting more money into a studio/shop (which is what we bought the building for). So, here it is August. The building has never been erected or even taken off pallets, and we are short of cash to finish our strawbale house before winter. Here's where the bargain comes in to play. We paid almost $6000 for this building on sale (and honestly, it was well worth it), but because we are desperate, we will sell it to you for $3800. You can check around, but I seriously doubt you will find another one this size and quality for less. If you do, you should grab it because that deal won't last!

Here are the specs (also check out my Craigslist ad if you are interested in seeing some actual pics of the pieces that make up the building -- although since it is still in pieces on pallets, there isn't much to see that will help you, Craigslist ad for our steel building) The short, straight walls are almost 6' tall (actually 71.38") so you have full head room over the entire interior space -- which is 20' x 25'. It is 16' tall -- which means you have enough room to put in a loft that you can walk around in over a 14' x 20' space and still have plenty of below 6' space for storage or low furniture on each side. It is made from heavy gauge Galvalume steel with incredibly deep corrugations for strength (the corrugations on the arches are 7-1/2" deep and the end wall corrugations are 3-1/2" deep). It is rated to withstand 115 mph winds, so definitely not a flimsy structure. The one end wall has a man-door cutout but no door. (Doors can be found a lot cheaper locally than buying from the manufacturer of the building!) The other end is open -- we planned to face it south and frame it with wood so we could better customize for doors and lots of windows.

Here are some similar buildings finished in different ways to give you a better idea of what it would look like when actually put up and completed. The basic building is shaped sort of like a loaf of bread, in that it is a quonset hut sitting on short straight walls instead of being curved right from ground level. This shot shows the same model -- but with different dimensions and with a large door ours doesn't have.

These show some of the options for end wall finishes ...
 
 

Some constructions shots, showing that you don't need cranes or fancy equipment to put one up -- just ladders, maybe some scaffolding and possibly a simple pulley system. (No single pieces weighs more than 40 lbs. so the top weight it could be for a single arch is only around 240 lbs. since each arch contains 6 pieces.
 

Slightly different model, same idea ...


Miscellaneous shots for ideas ...
 
 


Well, you get the idea ... Let me know if you're interested or have any questions I didn't answer in my Craigslist ad or here. Thanks for looking!
 
Nicole Alderman
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Posts: 1713
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
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So ... you need a house (or shed, shop, studio, etc.) and don't have much money? Have I got a bargain for you ...

We really goofed (this is not a commercial pitch, I promise), and bought an incredibly nice, strong, well-made steel S-Model quonset hut back in March of this year. After we got it, we decided that we got way ahead of ourselves, and really ought to have put the money into finishing our new house before putting more money into a studio/shop (which is what we bought the building for). So, here it is August. The building has never been erected or even taken off pallets, and we are short of cash to finish our strawbale house before winter. Here's where the bargain comes in to play. We paid almost $6000 for this building on sale (and honestly, it was well worth it), but because we are desperate, we will sell it to you for $3800. You can check around, but I seriously doubt you will find another one this size and quality for less. If you do, you should grab it because that deal won't last!

Here are the specs (also check out my Craigslist ad if you are interested in seeing some actual pics of the pieces that make up the building -- although since it is still in pieces on pallets, there isn't much to see that will help you, Craigslist ad for our steel building) The short, straight walls are almost 6' tall (actually 71.38") so you have full head room over the entire interior space -- which is 20' x 25'. It is 16' tall -- which means you have enough room to put in a loft that you can walk around in over a 14' x 20' space and still have plenty of below 6' space for storage or low furniture on each side. It is made from heavy gauge Galvalume steel with incredibly deep corrugations for strength (the corrugations on the arches are 7-1/2" deep and the end wall corrugations are 3-1/2" deep). It is rated to withstand 115 mph winds, so definitely not a flimsy structure. The one end wall has a man-door cutout but no door. (Doors can be found a lot cheaper locally than buying from the manufacturer of the building!) The other end is open -- we planned to face it south and frame it with wood so we could better customize for doors and lots of windows.

Here are some similar buildings finished in different ways to give you a better idea of what it would look like when actually put up and completed. The basic building is shaped sort of like a loaf of bread, in that it is a quonset hut sitting on short straight walls instead of being curved right from ground level. This shot shows the same model -- but with different dimensions and with a large door ours doesn't have.

These show some of the options for end wall finishes ...
 
 

Some constructions shots, showing that you don't need cranes or fancy equipment to put one up -- just ladders, maybe some scaffolding and possibly a simple pulley system. (No single pieces weighs more than 40 lbs. so the top weight it could be for a single arch is only around 240 lbs. since each arch contains 6 pieces.
 

Slightly different model, same idea ...


Miscellaneous shots for ideas ...
 
 


Well, you get the idea ... Let me know if you're interested or have any questions I didn't answer in my Craigslist ad or here. Thanks for looking!



 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
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Nicole Alderman wrote:It's neat seeing all the different things someone can do with a steel building! Just so you know, if you want a thread posted in multiple different forums/topics, you can either (A) Hit the report button and ask a moderator to add it to the forums you wanted it listed in, or (B) If you have PIE, you can add a thread to three different forums.

I gave you a slice of PIE so you can experiment with it. The PIE expires after a month, but you can get special discounts with it, add threads to different forums, get rid of ads, etc without losing your PIE.


Thank you so much Nicole!!! Yes, it is fun to see what can be done with these -- they really are incredible structures and with a very little bit of money and maybe a bit more time and elbow grease, can be really beautiful as well. My all time favorite is this one ...Arca by Marco Of course, living in a Brazilian jungle could make anything look glamorous!

 
Lincoln Zaegen
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Location: Clifton, Texas
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Deb Stephens wrote:Well, you get the idea ... Let me know if you're interested or have any questions I didn't answer in my Craigslist ad or here. Thanks for looking!



Very cool! How far along is the straw bale house?

Best of luck!
If I hadn't already started construction with two shipping containers, I'd seriously consider it!

 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
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Lincoln Zaegen wrote:
Deb Stephens wrote:Well, you get the idea ... Let me know if you're interested or have any questions I didn't answer in my Craigslist ad or here. Thanks for looking!



Very cool! How far along is the straw bale house?

Best of luck!
If I hadn't already started construction with two shipping containers, I'd seriously consider it!



We already have a house we built ourselves many years ago, so we have been slow to get started on the strawbale house. It was kind of a toss-up actually, because we have so much stone and wood that we vacillated between log cabins, cordwood and slip-formed stone ideas. Anything to do with dirt is out. We don't have any!!! Finally decided that strawbale made the most sense for us, but we definitely plan lots of stone and wood touches as we go. One of those "touches" is that we plan to slip-form the foundation with our native field stone, so we have spent a LOT of time collecting rocks. They're everywhere, but it still takes time to dig them out and haul them to our drop off spot. (And we still have to wash them!) Likewise, cutting and hauling the cedar posts we want to use to make bents (and later to build the porches and a few other small things, from). The bales will be infill in a sort of hybrid pole barn-like structure that supports the weight of the roof.

So ... to answer your question, we have gotten most of the way toward completed design, clearing and laying everything out and accumulating stone, wood and lumber to build with, and we have a delivery date of late September for the bales, but there isn't a lot on the ground at the moment. The house will be very small because we don't need much space and want a small footprint, so we shouldn't need a lot of time to put it up once everything is ready, and fortunately we still have our old house to live in until this one is done!

Good luck with those shipping containers. We toyed with the idea of doing something with those once, but we are just too far away from a port where you can easily find them cheap. After seeing what it would cost to have them shipped to us, we figured we might as well just buy something easier to make a house out of for a lot less. I would love to see what you end up with!
 
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