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My top loading washer needs your help  RSS feed

 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I have an old top loading clothes washing machine that needs repair. Yesterday, my helper loaded it all the way to the top, and ran the machine. It didn't like it.
It now has a slooow spin cycle and leaves several inches of the water still in the drum.

What do you think needs to be repaired on it? I suspect the pump. But maybe the motor too? A new, or even new to me machine was not in our plans!

Here is one list of available parts for my model. https://find.partswarehouse.com/?q=maytag+a112
I have ordered from this company for vacum parts and I am happy with their service.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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Sorry you're having trouble. I have used this site before to pinpoint the problem: Repair Clinic. Hope this helps. Good luck.
 
John Wolfram
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Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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In the past year, I've installed or repaired five different washers or dryers. Unless it is something simple like a dryer fuse, replacing the old washer is likely the most efficient course of action. In my area, fairly nice five year old washers can be found on Craigslist for about $120.

As an example, here's a newer Maytag washer in my area that will probably sell for a bit over $100:
https://web.archive.org/web/20170807150447/https://chicago.craigslist.org/nwi/app/d/maytag-washer/6244095185.html

 
Travis Johnson
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It might be an easy fix...what do you have for laundry going in? Sometimes a baby sock will get sucked into the pump or similar smaller item. That is a 20 minute free type of repair.

As for repairs, a new pump does mean a new washing machine as the cost of replacement is worth more then the machine, but there is NOTHING on a dryer that cannot be repaired cheaply. A lot of people toss out easily fixed dryers is what I am saying.
 
Jim Fry
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Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
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The two things I would check first are: When you overload its fairly common to get a small piece of clothes stuck in the water drain pipe. Tip the washer over on its front so you can see/access underneath. Use a screw driver or pliers to loosen the clamps and pull off the hoses going into the pump or drain, check for sock etc. The other thing to check is the v. belt. Is it loose or worn? If so, replace, --or possibly tighten if possible.
 
William Bronson
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Dale Hodgins
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I give away at least five perfectly operating top-loading washers, every year. With the vast majority of people going to front loaders, they are becoming an undesirable item similar to televisions with big tubes when the world wants flat screen.

Unless you live in a very poor area, I expect there will be perfectly functioning top-loaders, available for free. Besides Craigslist and other sites, you could call those who sell new appliances. Sometimes they take on the job of running these things to the scrap yard. It might also help to run your own ad. People may have put in the new one and put the old one in the garage.

I just made a quick search in your area, and found this. Let's hope this link works.   https://claz.org/nashville-tn/free.html?p=3
 
Josh Kunkel
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Location: Central Texas
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In my experience it always pays off to clean the drain filter.

It can be a messy job, have a low sided container with at least a couple quart volume available, and some rags or a mop handy. If your washer is a newer model you may be lucky and have the filter accessible, but in most cases you will have to remove a panel on the lower front of the machine to access the filter. These are often small head bolts. When you access the filter get the container ready and turn the back of the filter until it unthreads and slowly pull it out. Clean it out, replace and run a cycle before replacing the front panel. Sometimes this cleanup brings a seemingly dying machine back to full use. I'm hoping that this is all you need to do.

Amateur online appliance detective theory: The water level left in the tub could be because the filter is almost 100% clogged, the head pressure from the full drum overcomes the clogged filter and drains for a while but the low pressure at the end of the drain cycle can't push through the clog.

Everyone still reading should consider this simple maintenance on their washing machine, even if they are in good working order keeping a clean drain filter can avoid future issues.
 
Tammy Childress
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No help with the washer, I just wanted to say Hi from NW TN.
 
Daniel Brunner
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Location: United States
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That washing machine has drive belts so good bet that they need replacement. They may be slipping. Just a guess . I would at least inspect them before looking for a new washer.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 246
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Thanks everyone. I have yet to wrestle with the @#%^%$%. But it's time is coming!


Hi Tammy!!
 
Alley Bate
Posts: 20
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With the slow spin and not pumping after overloading it will likely be a stretched belt or other driveline problem.

For the price of parts and time troubleshooting I'd go the "new to me" route, but I do have a utility trailer and a dolly so picking up and dropping off the machines is pretty low effort.
 
christie pont
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:
I have an old top loading clothes washing machine that needs repair. Yesterday, my helper loaded it all the way to the top, and ran the machine. It didn't like it.
It now has a slooow spin cycle and leaves several inches of the water still in the drum.

What do you think needs to be repaired on it? I suspect the pump. But maybe the motor too? A new, or even new to me machine was not in our plans!

Here is one list of available parts for my model. https://find.partswarehouse.com/?q=maytag+a112
I have ordered from this company for vacum parts and I am happy with their service.


I had fixed my washer so many times my wife wanted me to buy a new one. NEVER i gasped, the only thing that breaks cost $7.50 and dies every 1.5 to 2 years it lives until the tranny dies. And then we bought another machine, I can't even tell you how old it was. I wanted to bury it in the yard!!

But your iussue, there are a few sites that give free video's on diagnostics and repair. One site had a yearly fee, or per problem fee for a good price and I think it was 3 months of lookups. Repair clinic sold me 500 bucks worth of parts that I returned. My local guy will not take back a screw once you buy it. In most cases a pump is an easy fix, and well worth the cost.

New appliance are made to live 10 years , not a millisecond more. The gent who sold me my new fridge explained, at a sales meeting "to the trade" a rep from the trade association announced it, no more 20 year fridges/washer/dryers. You will make money, he told them, guaranteed, appliances are now made to a 10 year standard.

that said, in my washer there are 2 expensive hard to fix parts, the tranny and the actual drive motor. Everything else is easy to replace, cost vary. I went from not being able to get the washer apart, to pulling the motor and replacing half of the coupling of it, and putting it back together in 1.5 hours to 25 minutes or less. I swear I fixed it 8 times at least. I even had a notation in my ratchet set, for which sizes I needed, also had that for certain fixes in my cars. I am not a mechanic, so if you know certain things will be needing help 1-2 times a year, a "note to self" on what size driver/extention is needed and left in the tool kit, it is great. I kid you not my wife said we can afford it you have fixed it 4 times, by that point I could fix it in under an hour.  I said but this is easier then a tune up on a car, this is easy and clean, and I can do it. Buy a new machine and you are tied to a repair man.

My machine did die from transmission leakitis and the replacement was difficult and worth half a new machine.  We did splurge our new machine is a Speed Queen, they come with 3 year in home guarantee, and are very fixable after that.  I do not fear a break down.  I have 1 gripe, there is no Buzzer to tell you the wash is done.

If you can not find the how to video's let me know, I will see if I can find them,

The machine is well worth fixing (to me).

I also fixed the dryer, which was way older then the last washer b4 death, that was hard to do. Since I only have 2 short arms, to replace the pivot/axle the drum turns on I used 8 very strong magnets to hold parts steady while I almost climbed in to start the first bolt, then 2 , then the rest. It was difficult, but doable. If I had a helper it would have gone much faster, But magnets worked very well. Heck if they can hold a screw nail they can hold a bolt or an axle in place!
 
Su Ba
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After fighting with two modern wash machines in the past few years (they each cost me over $600 in repair work before I threw them away when they broke yet again, and of course they were out of warranty when they started breaking down),  I finally looked for something better. I ended up buying a mechanical style Speed Queen. It's been working just fine. Yes, it cost quite a bit up front to buy, but in the long run I will save hundreds in not having constant repairs. Besides, I live two hours from the nearest repair shop so home visits cost money and trucking it to the shop myself is a hassle. Love my Speed Queen.
 
Bruce Blue
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Two key pieces of key info: 1. Machine overloaded. 2.Water not being pumped out.
Most likely something has gotten over the inner tub and is between the inner tub and the outer tub. This is usually a small piece of clothing like a sock etc. This is blocking the entrance to the pump and not allowing the washer to fully drain and hence the slow spin due to water resistance on the inner tub.
Hopefully it is only blocking the entrance and has not fully entered the water pump assembly and wrapped itself around the pump impeller.
This was a common problem when I worked in laundramats back in the 80's. One attempt is to use a medium sized fishing trebble hook on a cord to snag and extract the offending clothing. This only works if the clothing is NOT wrapped around the impeller.
You should be able to unplug the washer and remove front panel to locate and pinch/squeeze the rubber hose connecting the outer tub to the water pump. If there is an article of clothing, you should be able to feel it. Beware that removing the hose from the water pump inlet will result in a massive dump of the remaining water unless the tub to pump hose is "PINCHED" off securely. There is a special tool for pinching off this hose, but it is fairly expensive. Some auto mechanics/radiator repair shops have this tool ... perhaps to borrow one?  
Happy Trails...
BB
 
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