I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Composting near bindweed? Heap on top of wood?  RSS feed

 
Glyn Green
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We’ve recently taken on our first ever allotment (in Bristol, the UK) and there’s bindweed on our plot and on most of the nearby areas and neighbouring plots that are beyond our control. The compost piles on our plot unfortunately have bindweed growing up and through them, so we’re going to have to start again and try to avoid this in future. I know some (e.g. Charles Dowding) say you can kill bindweed in hot compost but we’re new gardeners and not confident we’d do this right.

I know that compost piles are ideally open to the ground underneath, so that worms and other soil life can move between the two but in our case bindweed would grow up in there too.

Could I put a very large flat thinish piece of wood down on the ground and then build a compost structure out of pallets on top of it. I’m thinking of a design where there’s a good foot or so of horizontal bare wood around each side at the base to provide a buffer of separation and we could keep an eye on it and pull up any bindweed trying to cross it.

Would such a compost pile still work even though it’s not open underneath? I figure we’d add some existing compost and worms in to start it off – maybe they’d survive and breed in there?
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1424
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
59
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wouldn't be worried about the bindweed.  If you make a pile on top of it, it will die.  As long as your pile heats up you will be fine.  And it will.  If it doesn't, just pop on here and ask and someone will get it going for you  

You may get bindweed growing back in if you leave the pile sit for a long time, but that will happen even if you raise it off the ground, and cover the ground.  The bindweed will just come in from the sides.

 
Glyn Green
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Even if the bindweed underneath is killed off there'll be lots of it nearby gradually sending roots in though, which could get mixed in if we were to go to use it. It doesn't seem ideal...

I'm wanting to have the compost raised off the grond with a buffer of a foot or so or bare wood around it on all sides, which we would easily check and remove any bindweed from. We're going to be generally doing that on out plot anyway. So long as we keep checking it and removing any trying to cross the bare wood it shouldn't be possible for the bindweed to get in.
 
Henry Jabel
pollinator
Posts: 192
Location: Worcestershire, England
17
bee bike forest garden fungi hugelkultur toxin-ectomy trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The method you are suggesting I think is a good one and it will still compost as the bacteria etc is always there and if you add worms that will help speed things up. I think it's sensible of you to rule out the hot compost method, it involves more work (I can't be bothered to turn mine and its at the end of my garden not the allotment) plus our wet climate can sometimes cool things down a bit if its not under cover. If you are using pallets just make sure they are heat treated and not treated with fungicide that may leech out.
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1424
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
59
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Henry Jabel wrote:The method you are suggesting I think is a good one and it will still compost as the bacteria etc is always there and if you add worms that will help speed things up. I think it's sensible of you to rule out the hot compost method, it involves more work (I can't be bothered to turn mine and its at the end of my garden not the allotment) plus our wet climate can sometimes cool things down a bit if its not under cover. If you are using pallets just make sure they are heat treated and not treated with fungicide that may leech out.


Whether it is raised or not, if you have moisture and some greens mixed with browns, you will still have hot compost, at least initially.  The advantages to hot compost are many, and 15 minutes a week turning doesn't seem bothersome to me.  Regardless, many people only turn their compost once.  It is largely a matter of how soon you need the compost.
 
What are you doing? You are supposed to be reading this tiny ad!
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!