I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Starting the second keyhole bed  RSS feed

 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6806
Location: Left Coast Canada
859
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Over the winter, I hope to build my second keyhole garden.  This time taking everything I learned from my first keyhole garden and making this one so much better.

Here are a few things I learned:

  • the sides of the bed are far too short.  I want them at least waist high.


  • Taller sides will make it easier to keep the chickens out and harvest the veggies.  This will also allow more room for filler material like a hugelkultur, and if I put the filler in over the rainy season, it will be moister for when we put the soil on top.  Given that the harvest produces lots of extra organic matter, I think starting it now is a good idea. 


  • I didn't get the filler material wet enough to hold moisture as well as I wanted


  • Winter rains will help with this.


  • wattle walls work surprisingly well - but would work better if the posts were stronger


  • To that end, I started making posts.  I'm experimenting with a tool called a froe and am trying to rive a cottonwood tree I chopped down (so I could destroy a nasty tent caterpillar nest). 




    I really don't think I have the hang of it as the froe kept wondering to the side. But I have a few posts and plan to try a different kind of tree to see if that makes things easier.





  • The compost bin was too small


  • It just filled up way too fast for us, I've had to build it up to make enough room for compost until we can make the new bin.



    We considered making this next one out of rock (there certainly is enough of it about) but decided to construct it out of compostable materials so that it will be easier to break apart and rebuild in 5 to 10 years. 
     
    r ranson
    master steward
    Posts: 6806
    Location: Left Coast Canada
    859
    books chicken cooking
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Here's some instructions on using a froe.



    For logs, the split is started with an axe or wedges and is oriented in the brake so that the split is close to parallel to the ground. With the froe blade centered on the log and parallel to the ground, drive the froe into the log with a wooden mallet and then lever the froe to advance the split. As the split advances, use a wedge behind the froe so the split does not close on the froe.

    If the split starts to wander off-center you can re-center it as shown in the diagram below. Be sure to keep the tip of the advancing crack close to or directly on top of the lower support log for this correction process and press down on the lower part as you rotate the froe to advance the split.


    and a post about riving black Locust
     
    Ghislaine de Lessines
    Posts: 208
    Location: Vermont, annual average precipitation is 39.87 Inches
    9
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I am very tempted to try making one of these beds!
     
    I miss the old days when I would think up a sinister scheme for world domination and you would show a little emotional support. So just look at this tiny ad:
    Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
    https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!