• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mark Tudor
  • Pearl Sutton

Austrian Winter Peas  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 1133
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
324
bee books food preservation forest garden cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have my turnips and kale and mustards and carrots in the ground and sprouting now. Yay!

Now I am wondering where to put the austrian winter peas that i had forgoten about...

My garden is set up in ground level beds, roughly 4 feet wide by 25 feet long.
I have my plants in rows roughly 8 inches apart. Would the austrian winter peas be happy in between those plants? Or must I throw them under a tree somewhere...? I may put them in my planned winter fallow area. It is kinda larger than I'd anticipated... This is my first time with these peas.

Thoughts?

Oh, in my climate most of these brassica overwinter pretty well without protection. Some winters they may look rather sad for a couple of weeks, but there are very few freeze killings.

Rape is one brassica that does not do well over wintering. Bye bye sweet greens.
 
Posts: 187
Location: Denmark 57N
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry no idea on peas, other than are they high or low type? That may dictate where they need to go. wow you can't overwinter rape? It's about the only brassica that will overwinter here, well if you can keep the pigeons off it.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
gardener
Posts: 1133
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
324
bee books food preservation forest garden cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Short, tall? I dunno. Bountiful gardens has this to say about them...

https://www.bountifulgardens.org/products/CAU-6920
Small, yellow soup peas with dark skins.
The green shoots make a wonderful winter salad crop, hardy down to 0 degrees.
Along with kale and spinach, you can have your own fresh salad all winter!
Hardy to zone 7 or 6 with row cover use - harvest growing tips often.
BOTANICAL NAME: Pisum sativum
GROWING INSTRUCTIONS:
A cold hardy field-pea. Sow in fall for winter growth (and to protect soil from erosion) & turn them under, or harvest for the compost pile, in the spring. Does well on poor soil & will fix nitrogen in the soil. For best growth and nitrogen production inoculate the seed before planting. Does not need a lot of water or care. May self-seed. Can be used for cattle fodder. The peas can be used dried for soup but are not good for fresh eating.   The shoots and leafy growing tips of the plants are popular for fresh eating, and make fine winter salad fare.
GROW BIOINTENSIVE® CULTURAL INFORMATION: C, W/Matures 17/Harvest 8-12/Yield 10/Spacing 5"
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Easy to grow and tolerates winter cold From the December 2014 Mother Earth News: "You can plant Austrian winter peas in late summer or fall, and then harvest the shoots for as long as eight months in many regions (October to May). I plant them in the fall in time for them to grow 8 to 12 inches before freezing temperatures arrive, and the peas overwinter just fine with no protection most years. Last winter was an especially cold one, yet I continued to harvest the winter pea shoots, along with kale and spinach, for terrific fresh, green salads right through the cold snaps."

"...grow 8 to 12 inches before freezing temperatures arrive..." Does this mean this is the height it reaches, or just as tall as it got before the weather turned?
 
gardener
Posts: 3739
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
952
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


The strain of Austrian winter peas that I grow have been hardy in USDA zone 4b (typically with snowcover) for the past 10 years. They are largish sprawling plants. They set seed very late in the growing season, so if you are growing them for seed, expect them take up the bed for most of the season, and to sprawl all over anything else in the bed. If you are only growing them as a cover crop, then they will get along fine with the other things until pulled in the spring.

 
pollinator
Posts: 547
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
71
bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur hunting
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in about the same climate and I love love love winter peas! I use them because they broadcast seed readily, but I suppose you could plant them in prepared soil. Honestly if I plant them just before a good rain the germination and see set are fantastic. I only had a few last year as a contaminant and I liked them so much I planted a whole bunch this year. I have not tried eating the seeds in soup but I have nibbled the greens, and they are delicious. This spring I should have enough that I can steal them and eat seeds, last year I saved as many as possible.

 
If you're gonna buy things, buy this thing and I get a fat kickback:
Perennial Vegetables: How to Use Them to Save Time and Energy
https://permies.com/t/96921/Planting-Perennial-Vegetables-Homestead
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!